Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Transporting goats  (Read 903 times)

Katie_goats

  • Joined Jul 2020
Transporting goats
« on: July 04, 2020, 11:11:39 am »
Hi, I'm new to goat keeping and would like to know how to transport them.
How high does a trailer need to be. Is 4 ft ok?
Alternatively I have a transit type van. Would this be ok to use if ventilated.
Thanks Katie

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2020, 06:24:45 pm »
To some extent it depends on the purpose of the transport in terms of whether or not it's linked to economic activity.  If there is no economic activity, there are no requirements.  If there is an economic activity the regulations apply and the distance is then relevant.   

This is a link to the welfare regulations: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/farm-animal-welfare-during-transportation

Note also that you need to notify the movement and depending on where you are will depend on how that gets done/who gets notified.  This is a starting point link for you: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/sheep-and-goat-keepers-how-to-report-animal-movements

This link may also be useful given that you've said you're a new keeper: https://www.gov.uk/topic/keeping-farmed-animals/sheep-identity-registration
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2020, 07:02:31 pm »
Van is totally fine - all the showing fold transport their goats in vans. Best to put one of the revolving fan thingies on the roof if the roof is flat.


4ft high trailer is also ok, but I would advise getting a 5ft wide one if you are towing behind a van, it drove me mad when I used to tow my wee Ifor williams and couldn't see it at all in my mirror...




Katie_goats

  • Joined Jul 2020
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2020, 09:10:54 pm »
Thanks for all the info and links. It's not linked to economic activity at the moment. I forgot to say - I'm in Wales and have been in touch with APHA.

Katie_goats

  • Joined Jul 2020
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2020, 09:15:49 pm »
Good news about the van. I did wonder about a roof fan. I was also looking at an ifor Williams trailer but the 4' one seems a bit small. Think I'll stick with the van for now!

bj_cardiff

  • Joined Feb 2017
  • Carmarthenshire
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2020, 06:45:11 am »
I think it would depend on why you would be transporting goats and how regularly. If your planning on showing them (when times allow), then a hot van parked on a sunny way would be horrible. But if your traveling from one address to another would be fine. I would always say to use a livestock trailer as they were designed for livestock, but in reality you use what you have availiable.

Katie_goats

  • Joined Jul 2020
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2020, 07:13:56 am »
Initially it will just be from one address to another and only of up to  about 30mins. If it's more than occasional travel then I would invest in a trailer.  I just want to get my first few goats. Haven't found any yet!

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2020, 07:27:11 am »
I think it would depend on why you would be transporting goats and how regularly. If your planning on showing them (when times allow), then a hot van parked on a sunny way would be horrible. But if your traveling from one address to another would be fine. I would always say to use a livestock trailer as they were designed for livestock, but in reality you use what you have availiable.


If you have ever checked out the goat section at a show you will find that most of us will transport their goats in vans - the goats are lead (leads and collar, with collar removed during transport) and hop in and out (unlike sheep which will need a ramp), usually we have an internal pen or division - so doors can be left open for air. The goats are not left in the van for longer than necessary - and it is usually as hot in the marquee as it is in the van.... Van also ideal for getting in feed (I can buy a quarter of a ton of feed in one go) and my van also takes 35 bales of hay/straw, about 20 haylage and is absolutely ideal for taking a goat (or small number of them) to the vet/AI etc etc. Much less maneuvering than a trailer, especially in tight places. Oh, and I sleep in the van during shows, as goat shows are usually and overnight event. But I do have a trailer as well, as goat numbers now mean it is easier to have both options of transport.

bj_cardiff

  • Joined Feb 2017
  • Carmarthenshire
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2020, 09:11:24 am »
If you have ever checked out the goat section at a show you will find that most of us will transport their goats in vans - the goats are lead (leads and collar, with collar removed during transport) and hop in and out (unlike sheep which will need a ramp), usually we have an internal pen or division - so doors can be left open for air. The goats are not left in the van for longer than necessary - and it is usually as hot in the marquee as it is in the van.... Van also ideal for getting in feed (I can buy a quarter of a ton of feed in one go) and my van also takes 35 bales of hay/straw, about 20 haylage and is absolutely ideal for taking a goat (or small number of them) to the vet/AI etc etc. Much less maneuvering than a trailer, especially in tight places. Oh, and I sleep in the van during shows, as goat shows are usually and overnight event. But I do have a trailer as well, as goat numbers now mean it is easier to have both options of transport.

Thats all very interesting. Are you legally allowed to transport livestock in a van though? I always though that livestock trailers had quite strict specifications to comply with in order that they can be used for transporting livestock.

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2020, 04:06:48 pm »
If you have ever checked out the goat section at a show you will find that most of us will transport their goats in vans - the goats are lead (leads and collar, with collar removed during transport) and hop in and out (unlike sheep which will need a ramp), usually we have an internal pen or division - so doors can be left open for air. The goats are not left in the van for longer than necessary - and it is usually as hot in the marquee as it is in the van.... Van also ideal for getting in feed (I can buy a quarter of a ton of feed in one go) and my van also takes 35 bales of hay/straw, about 20 haylage and is absolutely ideal for taking a goat (or small number of them) to the vet/AI etc etc. Much less maneuvering than a trailer, especially in tight places. Oh, and I sleep in the van during shows, as goat shows are usually and overnight event. But I do have a trailer as well, as goat numbers now mean it is easier to have both options of transport.

Thats all very interesting. Are you legally allowed to transport livestock in a van though? I always though that livestock trailers had quite strict specifications to comply with in order that they can be used for transporting livestock.


As long as you can disinfect the inside of the van (a removable rubber mat on the floor is usually sufficient), and the goats are led in and out, it is all perfectly legal. If it weren't, spot checks at shows would have stopped it by now. However I now usually have my goats in a trailer, as I have too much gear to take to shows, but lots of people now tow a caravan for them to sleep in with the goats being transported in the van. My OH would defo veto a caravan though...


If you have a set of hurdles that fit the inside of your van (mine are 5ft by 3ft) you can build a (removable) pen for just a couple of goats to be safely contained (like you would in a trailer), really good for quick vet visits or mating trips (though you may need the radio on full if you transport a goat in full season.. and you cannot stop for diesel either...)

Katie_goats

  • Joined Jul 2020
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2020, 01:39:45 pm »
Just another quick question about transporting goats in a van...
How many goats do you tend to transport in a van together for shows?
I'm thinking of collecting up to 4 adult nannys and maybe one kid. I'm not sure how much space they need. It's a short wheelbase Transit-type van.

harmony

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #11 on: July 31, 2020, 03:29:01 pm »
Enough room to lie down and stand up without standing on each other. Not enough room they can thrown about.

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2020, 05:42:14 pm »
Just another quick question about transporting goats in a van...
How many goats do you tend to transport in a van together for shows?
I'm thinking of collecting up to 4 adult nannys and maybe one kid. I'm not sure how much space they need. It's a short wheelbase Transit-type van.


Totally fine - only slight worry would be the kid. Does it belong to one of the nannies? If you can have the kid partitioned off so it cannot be trampled on, that would be best. A hurdle across the corner?


Btw, very few goats lie down during transport, but some do. Some bedding on the floor, and if it a longer journey, I always have a couple of 5ltr water cans with me and a bucket, but you usually also get water at service stations. I normally drive through, but if you get held up, offering a drink at this time of year may be nice for them (but only if you can open the van without the goats getting out).

Katie_goats

  • Joined Jul 2020
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #13 on: July 31, 2020, 06:01:39 pm »
Great thanks. It's likely I'll only be taking 3 nannys now, although the kid is one of theirs. It's a relatively short journey of 1.5 hours but I was going to take water anyway - just in case

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Transporting goats
« Reply #14 on: July 31, 2020, 10:35:40 pm »
Great thanks. It's likely I'll only be taking 3 nannys now, although the kid is one of theirs. It's a relatively short journey of 1.5 hours but I was going to take water anyway - just in case


Have fun with your goats!


 

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