Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Feeding lamblac to goat kids  (Read 566 times)

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« on: April 08, 2020, 02:31:20 pm »
Hello
Can you tell me how much lamblac or similar product do you feed to goat kids?
How much,at what age as well. My ones are 2 weeks old atm and just want to make I'm doing it properly!
Also when to feed more and when to start feeding less etc.

I know it is a little bit different than feeding lambs.

Thank you very much in advance!
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, geese rabbits and a little boy on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2020, 05:43:52 pm »
Goat kids need Lamlac at less of a concentration than lambs - it should say on the bag how much powder per ltr of water. Or google will know, I haven't fed Lamlac to goats before, I prefer Caprilac if I need to (much more expensive though).
My goat kids start off on 4 bottles a day ( after first 4 days on the dam), first two weeks as much as they take within 10 to 15 mins (warm), and they normally get to a full bottle by two to three weeks (GG's a bit less), then they are on 4 x 500ml (6am, 12noon, 6pm, 10 -11pm) plus they get offered calf mix, oats, readigrass and hay. At 12 weeks old I change to three feeds per day (usually leave out the lunchtime feed and offer concentrates etc instead), then drop a feed per month of age until 6 months, and then continue to give 10pm feed of milk as long as I have milk (and can be bothered dealing with rather rough kids by then - teats get bitten off etc). I always feed the milk warm to the touch (like you check for human babies - on your wrist)

I would think that if the kids are keen on concentrates and hay etc by 6 to 8 weeks old you can drop a feed or so earlier, lots of people wean abruptly at 12 weeks old. Given that Lamlac is not a cheap way of rearing kids, I would definitely wean earlier, but do it gradually. I wouldn't buy a new large bag of Lamlac by the time they are 3 months old.

Do you now if your kids' dams were booster vaccinated with Lambivac and/or Ovipast? If not you will need to start the vaccination at three weeks old (2 doses at 4 weeks apart), if you know that they have - then 8 to 10 weeks is advised.

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
Re: Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2020, 06:40:51 pm »
Ok thanks. The dams were all vaccinated with caprivac or heptavac dont remember the name!)
I've been feeding them 3 times a day so far - at 6am, 12 at noon and 7 in the evening. I'll boost their feeds a bit now.
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, geese rabbits and a little boy on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

McLeod

  • Joined Apr 2020
Re: Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2020, 11:11:33 am »
Lamlac can lead to scour in kids unless you get the mix rate right.  I couldn’t get my hands on goat milk replacer quick enough so was advised to use Graham’s Gold top full cream milk.  Of course I then got the goat milk replacer and he wouldn’t touch it! He did really well on the gold top but I assume goat replacer would be the ideal, if more expensive, option.

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
Re: Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2020, 09:22:54 am »
Last time I was bottle feeding goats kids I fed them only blue top asda cows milk. It obviously works out more expensive. At the moment I am glad I bought the lamlac as there are restrictions on how much milk you can buy in the shop and we drink a lot of milk at home  ;D

The kids are just starting to nibble on brambles and ivy- they dont really know with proper food. When outside they mostly bite dried sticks and not nice juicy long grass or weeds.
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, geese rabbits and a little boy on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2020, 09:56:33 am »
They will need hay and concentrate now definitely, and I have found readigrass is a good starter for them (mine do not go outside until much older).

Also wrt feeding shop-bought milk - it is not really good for their digestion to feed pasteurised and in particular homogenised milk.

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
Re: Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2020, 11:56:04 am »
They have unlimited hay all the time. I only let them ou for half an hour to run around with mi human kids at the moment - until I finish the secure fence - hopefully this week - I run out of u-nails  :thumbsup:
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, geese rabbits and a little boy on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2020, 01:45:45 pm »
I'd be concerned about feeding shop bought milk as there's a high chance you could be giving them Johnes Disease which would be an awful outcome. 

The mycobacterium that is believed to cause Johnes (in livestock) and Crohns (in humans) isn't killed by the pasteurisation process, and "mixing the milk" of many animals together (as happens at dairies, and in the tanker collection and through the processing plants), means the risk of contamination is very high.

Johnes is highly likely to be the next "scandal" to hit farmers once the focus is off COVID19 and the press are looking for another health related story of how farmers are trying to kill their customers.

Not suggesting everyone wants to join the scheme, but it's worth reading up on Johnes on the SRUC website  https://www.sruc.ac.uk/info/120113/premium_sheep_and_goat_health_schemes or through the GoatVetOz pages on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/goatvetoz/.
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2020, 03:00:14 pm »
I'd be concerned about feeding shop bought milk as there's a high chance you could be giving them Johnes Disease which would be an awful outcome. 

The mycobacterium that is believed to cause Johnes (in livestock) and Crohns (in humans) isn't killed by the pasteurisation process, and "mixing the milk" of many animals together (as happens at dairies, and in the tanker collection and through the processing plants), means the risk of contamination is very high.

Johnes is highly likely to be the next "scandal" to hit farmers once the focus is off COVID19 and the press are looking for another health related story of how farmers are trying to kill their customers.

Not suggesting everyone wants to join the scheme, but it's worth reading up on Johnes on the SRUC website  https://www.sruc.ac.uk/info/120113/premium_sheep_and_goat_health_schemes or through the GoatVetOz pages on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/goatvetoz/.
Please do not put unproven statements here - there is no scientific evidence that Johne's is passed from dairy animals to humans. And joining any of the SURC schemes is a waste of money for the small-scale breeder.

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2020, 12:03:55 pm »
I'd be concerned about feeding shop bought milk as there's a high chance you could be giving them Johnes Disease which would be an awful outcome. 

The mycobacterium that is believed to cause Johnes (in livestock) and Crohns (in humans) isn't killed by the pasteurisation process, and "mixing the milk" of many animals together (as happens at dairies, and in the tanker collection and through the processing plants), means the risk of contamination is very high.

Johnes is highly likely to be the next "scandal" to hit farmers once the focus is off COVID19 and the press are looking for another health related story of how farmers are trying to kill their customers.

Not suggesting everyone wants to join the scheme, but it's worth reading up on Johnes on the SRUC website  https://www.sruc.ac.uk/info/120113/premium_sheep_and_goat_health_schemes or through the GoatVetOz pages on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/goatvetoz/.
Please do not put unproven statements here - there is no scientific evidence that Johne's is passed from dairy animals to humans. And joining any of the SURC schemes is a waste of money for the small-scale breeder.

There appears to be significant scientific evidence of  MAP being the causative agent for both Johnes and Crohns.  Whilst not conclusively proven (you could argue the same about the link between cigarettes and lung cancer given that non smokers can also have lung cancer), scientists believe MAP to be the causative agent for both diseases and do appear to show links between the incidence rates of Crohns and Johnes in given areas.  It's not yet clear if there is a causative agent affecting both or if one is the causative agent for the other.

Scientists have also proven that MAP is not killed by either pasteurisation or cooking and some experiments have proven viable levels for transfer in both milk and meat. 

If you re-read my post, I haven't suggested that dairy animals pass the disease to humans (although some of the scientists have); I've suggested that I would be careful in feeding something to young stock that may carry a disease that if they contract could result in the ultimate destruction of the entire flock/herd on the premises as pressure increases to control this disease through culling (that is already happening in some locations around the world whilst others are totally ignoring it).

I would no more feed shop bought milk than I would feed raw milk from a CAE infected animal to my youngstock  precisely because you don't know what you're "importing".  It's basic bio-security to know that what you're feeding does not cause harm to your animals surely?

It's a matter of choice as to whether or not people choose to implement effective biosecurity and/or accredit their premises.  I was merely highlighting 2 sources of free information in relation to Johnes for those who may not be familiar with the disease and its impact.
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

Buttermilk

  • Joined Jul 2014
Re: Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2020, 05:20:40 pm »
The commercial goat farm I worked at fed the kids with ad-lib cold lamlac and weaned once the kids were eating a certain amount of creep feed a day.  They did very well on this system.

The shadster

  • Joined Aug 2015
Re: Feeding lamblac to goat kids
« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2020, 08:46:54 am »
I'd be concerned about feeding shop bought milk as there's a high chance you could be giving them Johnes Disease which would be an awful outcome. 

The mycobacterium that is believed to cause Johnes (in livestock) and Crohns (in humans) isn't killed by the pasteurisation process, and "mixing the milk" of many animals together (as happens at dairies, and in the tanker collection and through the processing plants), means the risk of contamination is very high.

Johnes is highly likely to be the next "scandal" to hit farmers once the focus is off COVID19 and the press are looking for another health related story of how farmers are trying to kill their customers.

Not suggesting everyone wants to join the scheme, but it's worth reading up on Johnes on the SRUC website  https://www.sruc.ac.uk/info/120113/premium_sheep_and_goat_health_schemes or through the GoatVetOz pages on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/goatvetoz/.

Thanks for posting this Scarlet Dragon, there’s a great 30 minute presentation link from the University of Wisconsin on the Facebook Goatvetoz link. I lost my small goat herd to Johne’s Disease a couple of years ago. I don’t think people realise how prevalent it is. Conservative estimates suggest a third of all cattle dairy herds in the UK are infected. My infection came from buying infected stock from a dairy farmer, who had diversified into breeding goats.

 
Advertisement
 

Feeding goat kids

Started by Sbom

Replies: 0
Views: 761
Last post October 12, 2016, 12:19:13 pm
by Sbom
bottle feeding kids

Started by poppy2012

Replies: 4
Views: 1848
Last post May 17, 2012, 06:05:11 pm
by fifixx
Bottle Feeding Kids

Started by Caroline1

Replies: 12
Views: 2923
Last post July 15, 2015, 12:42:47 pm
by Penninehillbilly
Feeding gg wether s and kids

Started by angie

Replies: 9
Views: 742
Last post May 17, 2019, 08:32:46 pm
by Bigdreams
Bottle feeding v leaving kids with mum

Started by Bumblebear

Replies: 16
Views: 4276
Last post October 29, 2012, 06:54:32 pm
by sokel

Forum sponsors

FibreHut Energy Helpline Thomson & Morgan Time for Paws Scottish Smallholder & Grower Festival Little Peckers

© The Accidental Smallholder Ltd 2003-2020. All rights reserved.

Design by Furness Internet

Site developed by Champion IS