Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: New blood  (Read 1302 times)

silver

  • Joined Feb 2020
New blood
« on: February 18, 2020, 10:30:34 am »
 :wave:

Hello! I have joined this forum as I am in early stages of planning and I am looking to start my own small holding somewhere in the UK!

I am hoping to get at least 5 hectares (permitted development rights) with hopes to build a farm house upon it (for use of those working on the holding)... I am hoping people here will be able to offer me good advice on these early stages, even stories of how you did it.

The plan would be a hope to keep a large range of poultry (including a DWA for emus and ostrich, eggs are in our minds eye for profit), some personal porkers, 2 horses, sheep, alpacas, bees, a lot of fruit trees, an 1/4 - 1/2 acre for self sustainability (veg)  and maybe grow a young forest (all permissions be it of course)

Any warnings and advice would be great, I used to be a farm hand (AI for breeding pigs and general farm work as well as a level 3 in animal management) and worked with dangerous animals in the RSPCA... so I am not concerned over my ability to care for animals.

I am however very very very green with the business side of things as well as the legislative! warnings and ideas, things to consider all welcome!?

RCTman

  • Joined Mar 2017
  • Rhondda fach
Re: New blood
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2020, 07:32:47 pm »
Hi and welcome, busy times ahead :wave:

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow. Some like to think it's in England.
Re: New blood
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2020, 04:54:33 pm »
Well @silver, as you are probably aware already, planning permission for a farm house will be the hardest thing to achieve.  Good luck though with your land searches and plans.

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: New blood
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2020, 09:00:00 am »
Are you planning to make your living from the holding?

silver

  • Joined Feb 2020
Re: New blood
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2020, 02:43:35 pm »
Hi! yea I am! that would be the plan... im just starting my first holiding now (a couple arces less than 3 seconds from my house!?!?!?!) so that will be my foot hold... I am going to try and make my living from this.. sick of the grind but lots of work to do before I can (gotta work to escape work)

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: New blood
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2020, 12:48:22 pm »
Hi! yea I am! that would be the plan... im just starting my first holiding now (a couple arces less than 3 seconds from my house!?!?!?!) so that will be my foot hold... I am going to try and make my living from this.. sick of the grind but lots of work to do before I can (gotta work to escape work)
Grind? Smallholding can be full of grind too. What's your business plan?

YorkshireLass

  • Joined Mar 2010
  • Just when I thought I'd settled down...!
Re: New blood
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2020, 07:34:55 pm »
I'd advise - do the boring stuff!


Forget the joy and "greater purpose" of e.g. keeping animals you enjoy.


Read up on commercial farming - what are local costs? What kit do people use? More importantly, what could apply to your situation? E.g. I know that big-bale hay is more cost effective but I don't have kit to handle it - yet. It's something I've filed away as a future priority.
Ditto current concerns around vet meds, wormers, legislation changes.


Look up standard business stuff - banking, VAT, self assessment taxes, accounting / book keeping. Even if you only have 3 hens to start with, have a "business hat" on. Track expenses. Lower expenses - to a point. Be brutally honest with yourself about what you can and can't afford, and what would be viable.


What are local facilities e.g. slaughterhouses, markets?


What are the environmental impact of your plans? Do you know about soil health, water quality?


If you're in England, AHDB have a Better Returns Programme which have good basic guides to lots of things. Obviously the concepts can apply in other countries but the exact legislation may differ. Similarly, in Wales there is Farming Connect.


Allow 5 times as long as you think for paperwork, I'm just setting up, I thought I knew the system but yikes!

Backinwellies

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Llandeilo Carmarthenshire
    • Nantygroes
    • Facebook
Re: New blood
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2020, 07:22:54 am »
I agree with all other posters here

double (at least) the amount of time and money you will need to but that plot .... often cheaper to buy an old farm and sell off what you dont want than fight the planning system.

The number of  animals you have listed will not fit on 5 acres ....  do your homework on how much land each needs ....  5 sheep to the acre is quoted but it is nearer 3 here on wet land ......  I imagine ostrich need very large areas  (just looked that up  as was interested ...... at least 1/4 per bird )   and 2 horses will need at least 2-3 acres  .....   if you are selling eggs then you will need to be near your market outlet (which rules out a lot of cheaper more isolated areas) 
  Is there a market for Ostrich still? ......  most farms started in 90's have gone.

As others have said do your homework and set realistic business plan ..... include costs of keeping the non productive animals

Good luck with your plans  :excited:
Linda

Don't wrestle with pigs, they will love it and you will just get all muddy.

Let go of who you are and become who you are meant to be.

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Womble

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • Stirlingshire, Central Scotland
Re: New blood
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2020, 08:31:01 am »
Hi and welcome.

I'm going to say be really deliberate as to whether this is going to provide your income or not. If it is, then yes, you're going to have to business plan like it's a military campaign. If it isn't, then whilst it pays to be clear on your objectives, this removes a bit of the pressure.


IIRC the issue with ostriches was that no abattoirs could handle them, and I can see why. Given that it's hard enough to get four legged livestock slaughtered and butchered these days, I reckon that bit would need some serious thought.
"All fungi are edible. Some fungi are only edible once." -Terry Pratchett

YorkshireLass

  • Joined Mar 2010
  • Just when I thought I'd settled down...!
Re: New blood
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2020, 08:38:36 pm »
If ostriches are for meat as well as eggs, I know of the chap who claims to be the *only* licensed ostrich slaughter-person. Now I haven't fact-checked this claim, but it implies it's not a common licence in any case!

 

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