NFU Mutual Smallholding Insurance

Author Topic: Bore hole - how do they work?  (Read 770 times)

plodder

  • Joined Sep 2018
Bore hole - how do they work?
« on: December 12, 2019, 09:37:43 pm »
Hi all,

I'd like to know about bore holes. I assume, hole in ground, lined, pump water, filter. does the water then get stored in a tank (in loft/out building?) then further pumped to taps etc?

Should we be wary of properties with own water supply? and just trust mains?

Cheers
plodder
Voss Electric Fence

bj_cardiff

  • Joined Feb 2017
  • Carmarthenshire
Re: Bore hole - how do they work?
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2019, 02:04:47 pm »
Mine is pretty basic, there is a borehole situated in the corner of the field, about 300m away from the house and maybe 20 metres higher up. It is about 2 metres deep and a metre accross the top, concrete sections. The water runs downhill to the house in a single alcathene pipe to a 'water house' which was bypassed by the last person who lived here, and then runs straight to the taps.

To put a new one in there are bound to be loads of requirements, filters or UV treatment, but if its an existing system I wouldn't bother with the filters or UV myself. You can have the water tested to check its safe or to check its mineral content/parasites etc.

I'd def see it as an advantage in a property, you'll be saving 400 a year which adds up over time!

henchard

  • Joined Dec 2010
  • Carmarthenshire
    • Two Retirees Start a New Life in Wales
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Re: Bore hole - how do they work?
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2019, 03:50:09 pm »
Hi all,

I'd like to know about bore holes. I assume, hole in ground, lined, pump water, filter. does the water then get stored in a tank (in loft/out building?) then further pumped to taps etc?

Should we be wary of properties with own water supply? and just trust mains?

Sort of - the borehole is usually lined with a slotted liner at lower leels to allow water to percolate and a solid liner near the surface to prevent the migration of surface water into the well.

Depending upon the speed at which the water is released from the rock there are two options. If the water is released quickly then the borehole itself can be used as the storage reservoir and a high output pump installed. If the rock releases water slowly then you can install a potable water storage tank on the surface to store the water above ground and a lower output pump will be used in the borehole with an additional transfer pump near the tank. The water storage tank can be on the surface, partially buried or below ground depending  on your location and requirements.

Private water supplies can be fine but do require some maintenance and sometimes treatment of the water. Mine is from a spring and I need to treat the acidity to stop it corroding the pipes in the house. I would say over the years the cost has been less than if we had been on a mains supply. However, a problematic supply - either poor water quality or lack of supply in hot weather (more likely to affect springs) can be a right PITA.

plodder

  • Joined Sep 2018
Re: Bore hole - how do they work?
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2019, 07:56:25 pm »
Thanks for the replies. If pumps are needed, do they run on demand to taps and or use a cistern type system to top up a holding tank? just thinking of electrical expenditure.

Cheers

Dav275

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Dumfries & Galloway
  • www.woodwallart.co.uk
    • WoodWallArt
Re: Bore hole - how do they work?
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2019, 10:56:05 pm »
Our borehole has a submerged electric pump about 65m down.   This runs, typically for about 30 seconds, to charge up a small pressure vessel to about 3 bar pressure.  Pump then shuts off.  As water is used in house, the pressure in the vessel gradually drops until it reaches a set point, when the pump kicks in again, and the cycle repeats.

Although the pump is relatively powerful, it's not on very much so power used is not huge. (We're off grid, so minimal power use is quite important to us).

juliem

  • Joined Aug 2014
Re: Bore hole - how do they work?
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2019, 11:54:50 pm »
My borehole has a submerged pump 13m down which is also pressurised by a  pressure tank on the surface .Can be problematic if you have a power cut...no water.Showers can sometimes get bunged up with sediment..I've had to have a filter fitted.Pressure tanks and electric pumps may have to be replaced every 15 years and can be expensive.
But not having to pay water rates over the years (accept emptying septic tank) I reckon I have come out the winner.

plodder

  • Joined Sep 2018
Re: Bore hole - how do they work?
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2019, 08:34:07 pm »
I'm starting to like the idea thanks .... I spose if you had solar panels and mainly used the water (thinking summer time) in day light hours the cost would reduce further.

Cheers

Dookie

  • Joined Dec 2018
Re: Bore hole - how do they work?
« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2019, 06:39:32 pm »
I have a deep well with an electric submersible pump which works ok... I think the thing you need to worry about is the possibility of contamination from any sewage soakaways, etc.  I'm not sure about boreholes, but a well must be at least 50m away from a septic tank...

 

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