NFU Mutual Smallholding Insurance

Author Topic: Cheviots  (Read 201 times)

NewLifeOnTheFarm

  • Joined Jun 2016
Cheviots
« on: March 14, 2019, 08:10:33 pm »
Hi all,

I went to speak to my lovely neighbours who are nearing 80, I had heard from other neighbours that they have been struggling, especially feeding pet lambs, so went to offer my assistance and also see if they had a few ewes I could buy from them. We have just finalised our land purchase, so I told them the good news and they were made up for us. So much so, that I came away with 14 of last years ewe lambs for practically nothing. (Would have been nothing if they had had their way!!)

Long tale short, wondering what crosses well with Cheviots? Tup would also be going in with our Shetlands too. As part of our land expansion we will be venturing into selling lambs at market for the first time, so assuming something like a Suffolk should work well?

Thanks.
Voss Electric Fence

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Cheviots
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2019, 08:36:45 pm »
Remind me where you are? 

There’s a roaring market for pure Cheviot at Longtown, which is as far NW in England as you can go.  Big dairy area, the dairy farmers love the little bunny rabbits at weaning, to run on the ground over winter and clean it of cattle worms, being ready to sell at a good price in spring, just as the cattle come back out into the fields.

Do you know which type of Cheviot you’ve got?  North Country?  Park?  Hill? 

Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

landroverroy

  • Joined Oct 2010
Re: Cheviots
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2019, 09:26:38 pm »
Suffolk will do well as they are easier lambing than say Texels, and the lambs are defined by their black faces. I have put a Suffolk tup to my shetlands with no problem. If selling fat they fatten fast on good grass, or if selling as stores are a popular cross to fatten on.
Rules are made:
  for the guidance of wise men
  and the obedience of fools.

CarolineJ

  • Joined Dec 2015
  • North coast of Scotland
Re: Cheviots
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2019, 07:35:10 am »
Cheviot mules seem to hold their price - Cheviot x Blue Face Leicester.

NewLifeOnTheFarm

  • Joined Jun 2016
Re: Cheviots
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2019, 08:20:48 am »
Remind me where you are? 

There’s a roaring market for pure Cheviot at Longtown, which is as far NW in England as you can go.  Big dairy area, the dairy farmers love the little bunny rabbits at weaning, to run on the ground over winter and clean it of cattle worms, being ready to sell at a good price in spring, just as the cattle come back out into the fields.

Do you know which type of Cheviot you’ve got?  North Country?  Park?  Hill?

We are in Aberdeenshire. I am led to believe they are hill type nccs.

shep53

  • Joined Jan 2011
  • Argyll
Re: Cheviots
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2019, 12:01:04 pm »
If I read this correctly then you will be putting 14 hill northie gimmers plus some Shetland  , ewes or gims ?     for their first lambing  Suffolk or BFL  could be to big , as ewes no problems so 2020 tupping .  Just buy or borrow a hill northie tup for an easier first lambing  . also this is a traditional cross with shetlands . you can then sell wethers  and ewe lambs for breeding or keep for own use ?

 

Does anyone know about Cheviots?

Started by Pikeman

Replies: 8
Views: 1199
Last post April 04, 2013, 11:07:36 am
by SallyintNorth

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