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Author Topic: Propagating sloe bushes  (Read 201 times)

Womble

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • Stirlingshire, Central Scotland
Propagating sloe bushes
« on: October 10, 2021, 05:06:02 pm »
Hi folks,

Has anybody propagated cuttings from sloe bushes before?

If it's possible, how should I go about doing it?

Many thanks!  :thumbsup:
"All fungi are edible. Some fungi are only edible once." -Terry Pratchett

Bywaters

  • Joined Apr 2016
Re: Propagating sloe bushes
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2021, 07:10:27 pm »
DO you mean take cuttings ?

They generally self seed  or send suckers up within a 1metre or so radius of the main tree HAve a careful look what is growing

Just a thought

Womble

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • Stirlingshire, Central Scotland
Re: Propagating sloe bushes
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2021, 07:43:51 pm »
Yes, that's what I meant. (I know nothing about plants).

Yes, there were some small ones growing that we could dig up - I just didn't really fancy doing that, as they're not on our land.
"All fungi are edible. Some fungi are only edible once." -Terry Pratchett

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: Propagating sloe bushes
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2021, 09:57:12 pm »
Are you sure you want them Womble?  Sloes grow on blackthorn, which is a vicious, spreading thug.  It's way of self-propagating means it creates great impenetrable thickets which trap sheep and people trying to cut them down, and their thorn scratches take months to heal.  Horrible stuff.  Much better to pick the sloes from someone else's trees.

Also, from Mr Google: <<Blackthorn Toxic Components Being a member of the Prunus family, Blackthorn contains varying amounts of cyanogenic glycosides---which convert to cyanide (prussic acid) when plant parts are chewed, crushed, trampled, or grinded. Cyanide is a highly toxic poison, which is quickly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream.>>


I'm not sure that 'grinded' is a word, but you get the idea.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2021, 09:59:41 pm by Fleecewife »
Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

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macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
  • Leicester
Re: Propagating sloe bushes
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2021, 11:08:53 pm »
Also, from Mr Google: <<Blackthorn Toxic Components Being a member of the Prunus family, Blackthorn contains varying amounts of cyanogenic glycosides---which convert to cyanide (prussic acid) when plant parts are chewed, crushed, trampled, or grinded. Cyanide is a highly toxic poison, which is quickly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream.>>

That unfortunately implies to all prunus family plants - I.e. ALL sloes, plums, gages, cherries, laurel, peaches, etc

When the leaves are eaten fresh from the tree (by livestock that is) they are OK in moderate amounts. When they are wilted they are highly poisonous! Once the leaves and branches are dried like hay - they are OK to be consumed by livestock, although not sure of this applies to all prunus species (cherry laurel?)

Last month I had to walk, with my bicycle, through nearly unpenetrable footpath overgrown from both sides by sloes. Not nice to push through, but the fruits were surprisingly nice! I was expecting really nasty bitter ones, but they were so sweet!
And then one of the trees was exactly what I expected  :roflanim:
It was disgusting  :innocent:
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, rabbits on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

Backinwellies

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Llandeilo Carmarthenshire
    • Nantygroes
    • Facebook
Re: Propagating sloe bushes
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2021, 08:09:50 am »
Dont do it!

Blackthorn is a vicious thug which spreads madly.  A splinter from it invariably turns septic.

Pick from others trees!

Macgro7  are you sure the first ones were sloes not bullaces or other varients?  Never heard of a sweet sloe
Linda

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Bywaters

  • Joined Apr 2016
Re: Propagating sloe bushes
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2021, 09:00:13 am »
Blackthorn has been used as hedging for livestock for centuries - and less so for Sloe Gin

Our sheep have coped with, and enjoyed, blackthorn for nie on 30 years

The neighbour might well be grateful for you to dig up a few small ones. Stop them spreading out of control

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
  • Leicester
Re: Propagating sloe bushes
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2021, 11:32:25 am »
Macgro7  are you sure the first ones were sloes not bullaces or other varients?  Never heard of a sweet sloe
No idea! They were tiny little plums - size of a grape or slightly smaller?
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, rabbits on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

 

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