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Author Topic: Carding/Peg Loom advice needed!  (Read 213 times)

wildandwooly

  • Joined Feb 2021
Carding/Peg Loom advice needed!
« on: April 26, 2021, 11:02:32 pm »
Has anyone got any recommendations please for carding combs (to card Shetland fleece) and/or peg looms? I'm wanting to have a go at both but have no idea regarding which to get, so any advice would be very much appreciated! Ta  :)
 :hugsheep:

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
Re: Carding/Peg Loom advice needed!
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2021, 11:17:30 pm »
I have carding combs but I don't use them for shetland fleece, which tends to be a bit short for combs.  I use carders and sometimes a blending board (as a carder), then spin from tight rolags.
I'm sure someone with deeper knowledge will have more detailed advice soon  :spin:
Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

 Love your soil - it's the the lifeblood of your land.

wildandwooly

  • Joined Feb 2021
Re: Carding/Peg Loom advice needed!
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2021, 11:30:55 pm »
Ah ok Fleecewife thanks. Hadn't even thought about the length  :thinking: That shows how little I know!  :D

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Carding/Peg Loom advice needed!
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2021, 10:56:20 am »
If you want to make a worsted or semi-worsted yarn then you would comb the fleece.  I have combed Shetland fleece on full-size English combs, but there was a lot of waste proportionally because of the short staple length relative to the distance across the 4 rows of tines.   Louet or Majacraft combs are both small enough, with a small distance across the 2 rows of teeth, to work well with Shetland fleece, without too much waste.  I spin very short Castlemilk Moorit fleece direct from my little 2-row Louets, and in fact I happily spin almost everything direct from my little 2-row Louets :).  I do have a set of 2-row Valkyrie Extra Fines which I find better for very long staple such as Wensleydale.

If you want a carded prep (for a woollen or semi-woollen yarn) then you want hand cards or a drum carder.  Shetland can be quite fine and can go into neps and noils very easily if handled roughly or inexpertly.  So you would be best with a fairly fine carding cloth, min 72 tpi, and for hand cards, ones with paired teeth in straight lines rather than all the teeth distributed evenly across the cloth, will give a better result.  (These are usually more expensive, or you could get just a piece of carding cloth and upgrade a pair of cheaper cards yourself.)

Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Carding/Peg Loom advice needed!
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2021, 11:00:52 am »
As to peg looms, I bought a home-made one and love it.  They are not precision implements, the most important thing is to get the maximum width you are going to want to use.  People often buy the little 1' ones "to try", then find they can only really make little tuffets.  Looking out for a secondhand one is always a good plan, just check there is no woodworm.  Then if you later decide you want a wider one, or that peg-looming is not for you, you can sell it on for what you paid for it.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
Re: Carding/Peg Loom advice needed!
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2021, 11:51:06 am »
I can't remember wildandwooly whether or not you have done any spinning before.  If not, then you could save yourself a lot of money by waiting until you have some idea of what you are doing and the equipment you need before you buy.
For example, if you roo your Shetlands by hand, then you can do it by pulling out a tuft at a time.  Then you will have a basket full of tufts and you can spin direct from them sometimes, without even combing or carding them, or you can use cheap dog combs or carders (the wire paddle brushes for dogs).  Learn about fleece and how it works, how its scales cling together as you draw out a thread and twist, how you can make your practice tuft into a short length of singles thread just in your hands, then fold it back on itself to make a stable double yarn.   You could do this with tufts of fleece from each of your sheep, and compare the fineness and crimp of each animal; you could do this with tufts chosen from various parts of the body, to learn how in many animals, the fleece is coarser and finer depending on whereabouts it grows.  An example of this is that often and in many breeds but not all, the fleece over the haunch and back legs, and perhaps over the back, is designed to withstand the worst of the weather, or for sitting on, so is coarser than the fleece which protects the neck, shoulders and flanks.   Basically, just play around with the wool your own sheep produce to familiarise yourself with those individuals. This is not something you can learn easily from someone else.  Get used to having fleece in your hand and drawing out fibres smoothly.   Once you've done that, watch a whole load of youtube clips about people spinning, learn the names for the equipment people use and the actions they carry out, ie familiarise yourself with the craft.  Then could be the time to join a guild, or to take some lessons, but leave plenty of time to practice on your own.  Your body has to learn the movements of your hands by constant repetition - there's no short cut.  Above all, relax as you play with your fleeces, don't spin when you are tense as it just won't work, and settle in for a lifetime of enjoyment and achievement.
You may want to learn using a spindle, or you may want to go directly to a wheel.  I wish I had started with a spindle - you can take it anywhere and it's amazing how quickly you can build up a cop of lovely homespun yarn.
As you have mentioned peg looming, you don't even need to card or spin the fleece for that, you can just draw out thick 'yarn' by hand and put it straight onto the loom.
If you already know all this, just tell me to shut up  :eyelashes: ;D
« Last Edit: April 27, 2021, 11:53:56 am by Fleecewife »
Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

 Love your soil - it's the the lifeblood of your land.

in the hills

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: Carding/Peg Loom advice needed!
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2021, 12:27:35 pm »
https://www.glyncanololdfarm.co.uk/

Take a look at this website for peg looms and peg looming courses. A lovely lady who is very helpful.

Hope that helps.

wildandwooly

  • Joined Feb 2021
Re: Carding/Peg Loom advice needed!
« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2021, 01:11:49 pm »
Brilliant! Thanks all very very much  :thumbsup: Great advice and I always take the stance I don't know everything Fleecewife so I'd never tell anyone to shut up  :roflanim: All very good advice and immensely helpful. I'm not a spinner but have friends who spin. One has offered to teach me in time but I doubt she's got the extreme patience she'd need to teach me  :roflanim:  I have seen someone use a spindle and I can see how it's so much more portable.
I'm looking at this as very much being a long term project for me not a 'do it in 5 mins' learning experience  ;)
I'm really enjoying just getting to know my Shetlands at the moment and have been rooing them in tufts and keeping it in bags. They're all very friendly now and seem to think I'm an ok human bean  ;D
 :hugsheep:


SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Carding/Peg Loom advice needed!
« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2021, 08:02:18 pm »

https://www.glyncanololdfarm.co.uk/

Take a look at this website for peg looms and peg looming courses. A lovely lady who is very helpful.
Hope that helps.

Removed formatting so we can read it!
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

wildandwooly

  • Joined Feb 2021
Re: Carding/Peg Loom advice needed!
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2021, 10:22:11 am »
 :roflanim: :thumbsup:

 

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