Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Ringworm  (Read 383 times)

PipKelpy

  • Joined Mar 2019
  • North Shropshire
  • Dreamer with docile cattle and sheep!
Ringworm
« on: October 02, 2021, 08:00:51 am »
I "share" rent a field with another smallholder. We have it on alternative years.

It's permanently electric fenced and the only main fencing is thick prickly hedging grown through a wooden fence and then the metal gate.

It is their year this year and are about to come off for end of agreement this month, then no-one gets until my time starts next January (not normal agreement but it works for us!)

Their current cattle are full of ringworm, even the calves! We don't need the grass, mine have only actually grazed it this year for 31 days (other chap couldn't use it, he asked me to graze it down!) Last year, my year, my girls were on it 52 days!

The rent is peppercorn but there is no water (I haul it) and no shelter so in blazing sun, I don't graze it. Cattle stay at home where I have trees. (Its walking distance!) It also no good for mowing.

I have said to mum previously to let it go, we don't really need it, but it's one of those things, once it's gone, it's gone. BUT the ringworm bothers me. My cattle are clean. I did ask the other chap why put them on, he said he didn't think.

Can ringworm be passed via the ground like Orf in sheep?
Halter train the cattle to keep them quiet but watch your back when they come a'bulling! Give them all names even those you plan to eat. Always be calm. Most importantly, invest in wellies with steel toe caps and be prepared for the clever cow who knows where the toe caps end!!

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder

shep53

  • Joined Jan 2011
  • Dumfries & Galloway
Re: Ringworm
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2021, 11:30:10 am »
Ring worm ,like Orf can survive for a long time off the host  on fence posts /gates /trees so long as skin cells from an animal rubbing are there . It is a zoonosis so people /dogs can be infected , long time ago a friend came to help for a day and we cleaned out wooden calf pens that were empty  and he caught ring worm on his hand /arm 

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Ringworm
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2021, 01:19:51 pm »
You could always vaccinate yours before moving them to the field . Speak to your vet for more info as would need to import it at the moment I think.

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: Ringworm
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2021, 01:26:01 pm »
Ring worm ,like Orf can survive for a long time off the host  on fence posts /gates /trees so long as skin cells from an animal rubbing are there . It is a zoonosis so people /dogs can be infected , long time ago a friend came to help for a day and we cleaned out wooden calf pens that were empty  and he caught ring worm on his hand /arm
Yep, I got ringworm handling calves many years ago.

sabrina

  • Joined Nov 2008
Re: Ringworm
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2021, 02:21:04 pm »
My ponies got ringworm off a field gate. Therehad not been cattle on this land for years. I then had to scrub all my stable barn as the ponies had been in before I saw the ringworm. Got it on my hand. Not been a problem since.

landroverroy

  • Joined Oct 2010
Re: Ringworm
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2021, 02:44:49 pm »
Are you sure it is ringworm they have got? I was interested that you say " their's are full of ringworm, even the calves". It is normally an infection more of calves than adults. I have had it in bought in calves, but only on one adult (again bought in) but that was slight and disappeared in a few weeks when grazed outside. It traditionally goes in sunlight, and I never had it spread to any others grazing the same land. (Although I accept that it happens.)
Is this ringworm in the tradition form of circular patches, or is it more widespread and irregular in shape? If the latter, it is more likely caused by mites. This can, if untreated, end up extensive - like mange in dogs. But easily treated with a pour on - Ivomec or similar.   
 As to keeping the land - I would be loathe to let it go as it's cheap and you never know when you might need it.
Rules are made:
  for the guidance of wise men
  and the obedience of fools.

PipKelpy

  • Joined Mar 2019
  • North Shropshire
  • Dreamer with docile cattle and sheep!
Re: Ringworm
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2021, 09:49:29 pm »
Are you sure it is ringworm they have got? I was interested that you say " their's are full of ringworm, even the calves". It is normally an infection more of calves than adults. I have had it in bought in calves, but only on one adult (again bought in) but that was slight and disappeared in a few weeks when grazed outside. It traditionally goes in sunlight, and I never had it spread to any others grazing the same land. (Although I accept that it happens.)
Is this ringworm in the tradition form of circular patches, or is it more widespread and irregular in shape? If the latter, it is more likely caused by mites. This can, if untreated, end up extensive - like mange in dogs. But easily treated with a pour on - Ivomec or similar.   
 As to keeping the land - I would be loathe to let it go as it's cheap and you never know when you might need it.

Mum says the same about the land, yeah, it's ringworm! The cows have it on their shoulders, so do the calves, also the calves have it on their faces (poor little buggers!). Apparently it was one the reasons he got the cattle "cheap". Personally I wouldn't have bought anything with it in. Them blasted Wiltshires I bought in came with orf (it developed soon after landing here) but the last time my tribe got it was a very mild case 3 years ago. (I say mild as it has done the rounds a few years earlier!) But ringworm is something we have dodged, we've NEVER had it, ever!! An escapee Shorthorn jumped in 20 years ago and I complained to the owner as our cattle were a couple of weeks off departing to auction. He was pleasant enough, apparently he was renting land and the other tenant had done what has happened to me, bought in cattle full of ringworm, plonked them in a field, they'd jumped into his and his herd got infected! We escaped.that infection though and i don't want my current pair getting infected as they'll have calves on them in December (hopefully) then a visit off a bull February/March time.
Halter train the cattle to keep them quiet but watch your back when they come a'bulling! Give them all names even those you plan to eat. Always be calm. Most importantly, invest in wellies with steel toe caps and be prepared for the clever cow who knows where the toe caps end!!

 

Ringworm question

Started by shropshire_blue (9.06)

Replies: 8
Views: 4000
Last post June 11, 2012, 08:30:05 pm
by dannidub2000
what does ringworm look like and how to cure

Started by wallyward (9.06)

Replies: 18
Views: 6018
Last post July 11, 2013, 07:54:07 am
by wallyward

Forum sponsors

FibreHut Energy Helpline Thomson & Morgan Time for Paws Scottish Smallholder & Grower Festival Ark Farm Livestock Movement Service

© The Accidental Smallholder Ltd 2003-2021. All rights reserved.

Design by Furness Internet

Site developed by Champion IS