Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Wood Burning Stove Flue  (Read 1499 times)

Fishyhaddock

  • Joined Apr 2009
  • aberdeenshire
Wood Burning Stove Flue
« on: August 29, 2019, 08:47:25 pm »
Hi,
Hope somebody out there can help/advise? I am about to purchase some twin wall flue pipe and parts for a stove i am going to fit.


 Has anyone ever used the twin wall flue pipe from StovesAreUs?


 I was wondering about its quality etc as the website doesn't give much away about it's origin?


The cynic in me is thinking its probably cheap(er) Chinese rubbish maybe?  Stoves online appear to have better stuff but obviously its a fare bit more expensive!!  Any information and advice would be much appreciated.


Thanks in advance  Fishy.

doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
  • Qui? Moi?
    • ABERDON GUNDOGS for work and show
    • Facebook
Re: Wood Burning Stove Flue
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2019, 10:01:26 pm »
I had a wood burning stove installed a few years ago.  I went to Stirling Stove Centre for everything and a local tradesman fitted it for me.

I didn't have a chimney so had to have a twin walled flue - the twin wall flue is essentially a flue pipe, inside another flue pipe with a layer of insulation between the two pieces. This layer ensures that the exterior of the twin wall flue does not get hot enough to cause damage to surround structures.  I would think the level and type of insulation  might vary, thus creating different prices.  There might also be a difference in the quality of aluminium
(Edited - I'm not an engineer so no it isn't aluminium, stainless steel maybe?  I don't have a clue - it's shiny silver stuff  :roflanim: :roflanim:)
I would suggest you ask a local stove specialist (if you have one nearby) to expalin what is involved before you choose
« Last Edit: August 30, 2019, 07:54:53 pm by doganjo »
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

pgkevet

  • Joined Jul 2011
Re: Wood Burning Stove Flue
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2019, 05:07:22 am »
Doganjo: Aluminium? I doubt it and certainly hope it wasn't; melting point too low and a good DIY way of ending up with your cast boiler becoming a thermite mix  :o
Fishyhaddock.. it looks like the first source's chimneys are claimed to be HETAS approved therefore ought to be OK/ I'm less concerned about that that the problems of DIY install which unless certified by a HETAS fitter might lead to insurance issues and something to be looked into? Havig said that I had my hobbyshed woodburner fitted by a HETAS approved fitter and had to correct his own interpretation of the rules and point out errors he was making. That and the stupid slow install he did and the stupid high cost he tried to charge.
After the initial enthusiasm re woodburners and despite the fact that my land has more than enough timber we use it as little as possible.. the dust and mess of using it, effort of cutting and hauling wood and chimney sweeping needs every few months (more mess unless paying out for a sweep's commercial tooling). Yes it's nice heat when in use but the downsides are there. I'm friendly with local fire chief and house fires are very rare now due to better electrics and reduced cig smoking...almost all are wood/coal chimney fires...

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Wood Burning Stove Flue
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2019, 10:25:10 am »
Having had Carbon Monoxide poisoning twice, I certainly wouldn't risk installing a potentially sub-standard flue product, whatever the apparent cost saving. I can assure you that not being able to stand, or standing and then falling over are not pleasant sensations. If the stainless is of poor quality it could rupture leaking CO into the house and if you do survive that you will have to re-install the flue. I would expect quality parts to carry a British Standard number/ kite mark.


Also important that it is installed so that it can be swept properly, because some I have seen cannot be.

pgkevet

  • Joined Jul 2011
Re: Wood Burning Stove Flue
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2019, 10:37:46 pm »
Having had Carbon Monoxide poisoning twice, I certainly wouldn't risk installing a potentially sub-standard flue product, whatever the apparent cost saving. I can assure you that not being able to stand, or standing and then falling over are not pleasant sensations. If the stainless is of poor quality it could rupture leaking CO into the house and if you do survive that you will have to re-install the flue. I would expect quality parts to carry a British Standard number/ kite mark.


Also important that it is installed so that it can be swept properly, because some I have seen cannot be.
Also had a CO episode..despite meeting regulations when the burner was running flat out the installed vent was inadequate - I now leave the window cracked open when the fire is lit. The CO alarm went off and at first i assumed it was faulty - then realised I was getting dizzy. Moral of this tale is get a bloody good loud CO alarm as mine is - you can't ignore it hammering alarm bells and shouting 'Fire'.
I second the point about making life easy with an easy to sweep solution but reality these days is that price is no indication of quality "You get what you get ripped off for"

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Wood Burning Stove Flue
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2019, 07:04:02 am »
CO alarms go off at 50ppm, if I remember correctly. At 200ppm you only have seconds to get out of the building. Neither time did our alarm go off, so they really are only of use in the event of some kind of failure. I suffered from a cumulative effect of exposure at a much lower level over a period of days. It takes 6 weeks to fully recover- that's the period over which the blood cells are renewed.

Rupert the bear

  • Joined Jun 2015
Re: Wood Burning Stove Flue
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2019, 12:37:38 pm »
Positioning of your co, co2 and hydrocarbon alarms is very important ie floor level ,close to any potential source and in an draught free as possible location.

pgkevet

  • Joined Jul 2011
Re: Wood Burning Stove Flue
« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2019, 12:41:13 pm »
CO alarms go off at 50ppm, if I remember correctly. At 200ppm you only have seconds to get out of the building. Neither time did our alarm go off, so they really are only of use in the event of some kind of failure. I suffered from a cumulative effect of exposure at a much lower level over a period of days. It takes 6 weeks to fully recover- that's the period over which the blood cells are renewed.
Interesting..and see below..
https://www.kidde.com/home-safety/en/us/support/help-center/browse-articles/articles/what_are_the_carbon_monoxide_levels_that_will_sound_the_alarm_.aspx

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Wood Burning Stove Flue
« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2019, 07:07:19 am »
Two things the government here tells you to do if you heat with a woodburner are:-
Open all doors and windows for 12 minutes (why 12?) every day to limit CO buildup.
Open the nearest window before opening the fire to prevent flue gas being drawn back into the building.

 

Wood burning hot tubs

Started by Ghdp (13.35)

Replies: 8
Views: 2050
Last post January 11, 2016, 07:38:21 pm
by verdifish
Lined flue

Started by Ghdp (9.12)

Replies: 4
Views: 2349
Last post October 27, 2015, 01:22:49 pm
by Ghdp
Woodburing stove - install cost?

Started by blades (7.26)

Replies: 6
Views: 4091
Last post March 10, 2012, 06:57:11 pm
by bazzais
Independent HETAS stove installer in Aberdeenshire

Started by GWC (7.18)

Replies: 4
Views: 2445
Last post August 11, 2015, 09:43:52 am
by greengumbo
What size wood?

Started by edessex (6.16)

Replies: 8
Views: 3275
Last post May 15, 2013, 04:37:49 am
by chrismahon

Forum sponsors

FibreHut Energy Helpline Thomson & Morgan Time for Paws Scottish Smallholder & Grower Festival Ark Farm Livestock Movement Service

© The Accidental Smallholder Ltd 2003-2021. All rights reserved.

Design by Furness Internet

Site developed by Champion IS