Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Tatty Diggin  (Read 4494 times)

Plantoid

  • Joined May 2011
  • Yorkshireman on a hill in wet South Wales
Re: Tatty Diggin
« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2011, 09:14:49 pm »
That is some claggy field  i take it it is acid  and clay due to being laid down as glacial silts .

I'd bung as much well rotted straw based manure it in it as you can over six or seven years & lime it should crumb the soil & dry out a bit . As well as deep dig a drainage trench and back fill with crushed 10 mm clean stone on top of 100 mm land drain poly pipe set on a decent bed of the same stone.  But that is expensive.

 A spinner ain't much cop in clag like that you'd need a power washer and a spade  ;D

Can you beg steal or borrow a pan buster foot for the tractor and drag it down the hill to help run off the water faster ?
International playboy & liar .
Man of the world not a country

Odin

  • Joined Oct 2011
  • Huddersfield
Re: Tatty Diggin
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2011, 03:40:56 am »
 :farmer: The water problem that you can see is only at the bottom of the field in that dip. Behind the photographer there is a dry stone wall with water pouring through from a broken clay pipe, thats someone elses land who is not bothered as his cattle drink there. Also in our adjacent field above is our Duck Pond or Victorian land drainage sump ( describes it better ) that fails to hold water and runs away under where them photos are taken.  :&>  :&>
The soil depth is a good eight inch and then clay. All I have done with that field prior to planting the seed spuds was rotorvate it with that 1210 David Brown. I tried with a 3 furrow plough that we renovated but it would not penetrate the couch grass, the plough did work else where as we tested it. The field has not seen manure, fertilizer or anything in at least two decades. The potatoes have worked wonders with that field away from the boggy area at the bottom, some of the spuds are between one & half to two pounds in weight, they are like house bricks, not hollow and in demand from users. So thats what its about, the end result, the crop. There are areas where the crop has produced lots of small potatoes ? ? Studying the soil between big spuds and little spud furrows, we think its because the rotorvator did a better job making a finer tilth ? I paid 150 for a 6ft Howard Rotorvator that had been stud in a field for many year, some of the blades were missing or weak. I greased it up and put it straight to work, took a chance.  :hshoe:  When it was finished many of the blades were broken. I replaced over 2 dozen blades since and spent some time on the machine ready for next season.
Its all been a learning curve using machines to do an acre. There are only 6 furrows left to lift (40 yards long). I estimate that there is 60 to 90 kg per furrow. One of them yellow builders tubs holds approximately 15kg in spuds. Can easily get 6 per furrow. When they are all out, then the Muck Spreader will be launched into action, but thats another story. Tune in for next weeks episode kiddies.  :o   :spud: :spud: :spud:
A man who cannot till the soil cannot till his own soul !
A son of the soil .

Blonde

  • Joined Mar 2011
Re: Tatty Diggin
« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2011, 01:39:01 pm »
:farmer: The water problem that you can see is only at the bottom of the field in that dip. Behind the photographer there is a dry stone wall with water pouring through from a broken clay pipe, thats someone elses land who is not bothered as his cattle drink there. Also in our adjacent field above is our Duck Pond or Victorian land drainage sump ( describes it better ) that fails to hold water and runs away under where them photos are taken.  :&>  :&>
The soil depth is a good eight inch and then clay. All I have done with that field prior to planting the seed spuds was rotorvate it with that 1210 David Brown. I tried with a 3 furrow plough that we renovated but it would not penetrate the couch grass, the plough did work else where as we tested it. The field has not seen manure, fertilizer or anything in at least two decades. The potatoes have worked wonders with that field away from the boggy area at the bottom, some of the spuds are between one & half to two pounds in weight, they are like house bricks, not hollow and in demand from users. So thats what its about, the end result, the crop. There are areas where the crop has produced lots of small potatoes ? ? Studying the soil between big spuds and little spud furrows, we think its because the rotorvator did a better job making a finer tilth ? I paid 150 for a 6ft Howard Rotorvator that had been stud in a field for many year, some of the blades were missing or weak. I greased it up and put it straight to work, took a chance.  :hshoe:  When it was finished many of the blades were broken. I replaced over 2 dozen blades since and spent some time on the machine ready for next season.
Its all been a learning curve using machines to do an acre. There are only 6 furrows left to lift (40 yards long). I estimate that there is 60 to 90 kg per furrow. One of them yellow builders tubs holds approximately 15kg in spuds. Can easily get 6 per furrow. When they are all out, then the Muck Spreader will be launched into action, but thats another story. Tune in for next weeks episode kiddies.  :o   :spud: :spud: :spud:
I have just dug my metre square tattie patch  for a few new potatoes....got a few  and they are just so tasty has a few tonight for dinner.  Got a few kilos,  have not weighed them...

 

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