Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Lambing  (Read 114 times)

rach2808

  • Joined Sep 2022
Lambing
« on: September 27, 2022, 08:48:26 pm »
Hi everyone … I’m looking for some advice ..
I have 4 ewes and I plan to lamb for the first time end of March/ early April . I have a 4 acre field with no buildings but I do have a field shelter 12x8 that I could put two pens inside .
Having never lambed myself before I am unsure as to what plans to make for shelter etc.

I am torn between using my shelter and hoping they don’t all lamb at the exact same time or trying to rent space in a barn from a local farmer .. this would give me lighting, water electricity and plenty of space ( at a cost)

So the question is what would you do ?? Or what do you do if you have lane but no buildings ?
Many thanks 

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Lambing
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2022, 09:19:18 pm »
I would leave them where they are to be honest. From a bio security point of view moving them to someone else’s farm makes me uneasy. Make sure your ram is raddled and then make a note of tupping dates. You can keep them in overnight if one starts lambing in the evening, so it’s not like you’ve got a field with no shelter at all. What breed are they?

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Lambing
« Reply #2 on: Today at 07:10:13 am »
Yes - what breed are the ewes and the ram? Most ewes will lamb happily outside if lambed from April onwards, and I number my ewes in October (as in big number sprayed on their side), then raddle the tup (with the powdered stuff not the harness) and take notes every day of freshly coloured bums. This means I know at least the order in which they should lamb and I know which ewe to look out for.


I would not move them to another holding, not only will it be stressful for them in late pregnancy, the biosecurity risk is just not worth it.


You can also build a smaller pen (with hurdles) round the outside of your field shelöter, and then put them inside that for the night (with some food and water), so you can check on them easily during the night if you are worried. I also now know which areas of my field my ewes like to lamb in - next to the fence and in corners are the favoured spots.


If not housed, ewes will normally not lamb during the night, and do it either first thing in the morning or around sunset in the evening. If a ewe has started to lamb in the evening on your last check, stay with her, or move her inside if you can (not always possible).


Lambing outside is far less stressful than in a big shed.

Richmond

  • Joined Sep 2020
  • Norfolk
Re: Lambing
« Reply #3 on: Today at 08:32:32 am »
If you can get hold of some old bales - either straw or hay - they can be used to build temporary shelters. Something in a cross shape works well as then the sheep can seek out shelter regardless of which direction the wind is coming from. We have a large quantity of "road pins" (metal spikes for securing fencing and the like) which when driven through a couple of bales keeps them upright and stable.

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Lambing
« Reply #4 on: Today at 09:23:11 am »
If you can get hold of some old bales - either straw or hay


Oh yes, in the distant past... but unaffordable now! Cheaper to get some pallets for free...

Richmond

  • Joined Sep 2020
  • Norfolk
Re: Lambing
« Reply #5 on: Today at 09:44:10 am »
The chap who came to cut our hay this year had a massive surplus left from last year (he said). It was a good hay year round here last year. We're feeding 2021 hay atm and have been doing so since July due to drought (saving 2022 hay for later in the winter) but used spoiled bales to make a lambing shelter in the Spring.

 

Forum sponsors

FibreHut Energy Helpline Thomson & Morgan Time for Paws Scottish Smallholder & Grower Festival Ark Farm Livestock Movement Service

© The Accidental Smallholder Ltd 2003-2022. All rights reserved.

Design by Furness Internet

Site developed by Champion IS