Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: vaccinations  (Read 4538 times)

Pixie

  • Joined Jan 2013
vaccinations
« on: February 04, 2013, 11:14:47 am »
So i'v been  looking into the world of vaccinations.Does anyone have any advice on what i should vaccinate for and how often on pet ewes which i'm not going to be using for lambing.

Thanks  :tree:

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2013, 12:33:59 pm »
I would do them with Heptavac because it protects for soil borne things like tetanus.

Other than that, I don't think there's anything routine unless you have a particular identified problem.


lachlanandmarcus

  • Joined Aug 2010
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2013, 01:26:11 pm »
I'm with Rosemary - our only routine is heptavac P+. Smallholder outdoor systems, forage based feeding, low incidence of comings and goings of new stock, and low stocking rates and field rotation generally ( tho not always) mean that a lot of things that commercial farmers vaccinate for as routine are not required except when an issue arises. For instance, we only worm/fluke if a specific sheep appears to have an issue - to date that has meant no worming and one sheep fluked in 4 years. We have never lost a lamb once it had been born other than one tiny twin to a golden eagle (!) and one to a stray dog :-(((, nothing to disease.

SteveHants

  • Joined Aug 2011
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2013, 02:20:48 pm »
I use bravoxin now - cheaper than Heptavac, but doesn't do pneumonia. However, that part of the heptavac vaccination doesn't last long anyway, apparently.

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2013, 03:39:08 pm »
Last year for our pet lambs we heptavac'd and also treated with combinex as the lambs from the year before were flukey- OH's sister only found out when they were slaughtered.

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2013, 07:35:59 pm »
I didn't include internal parasites in my thoughts on vaccinations.

Fluke (Fasciola hepatica)is very dangerous to sheep and is on the increase due to the warmer, wetter climate. Faecal worm egg tests are not reliable in detecting fluke so you should check with your vet about the fluke forecast for your area. You can get flukicides that are seperate from wormers and your vet may be able to give you a small amount for yoru sheep. Unlike worms, fluke isn't species specific and is carried by sheep, cattle, horses, goats, rabbits. Depending on the area, you may need to fluke twice - once in autumn and once in spring - or more frequently over the winter months.

Depending on where you got your sheep from, stocking density, rotation and presence of other grazing species, internal worms may or may not be a problem. Personally, I'd test them once a year and worm if required.

You'll also need to treat for external parasites but not with a vaccine.

lachlanandmarcus

  • Joined Aug 2010
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2013, 07:55:18 pm »
Is that routine fluke treatment a good thing even if your sheep fields are fairly dry and you haven't had any fluke issues in e last (eg re abattoir report/failing to thrive)?


Also today this came out...which might impact ability to use it in young breeding ewes?http://www.nfuonline.com/News/Important-changes-to-flukicide-regulation/

SteveHants

  • Joined Aug 2011
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2013, 09:29:25 pm »
Most vets are suggesting you take a risk-based approach to fluking. I haven't fluked my ewes on top of the downs as it remains dry up there - the water just runs off. I have fluked lambs further down - even though fluke hasn't traditionally been a problem for me.


However, since a couple of pneumonia related deaths, inspection of livers can confirm that they are fluke free anyway.

Calvadnack

  • Joined Jun 2009
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2013, 12:17:05 pm »
This fluke regulation change has completely passed me by especially as it's not on the SCOPS site.


Have other peoples' vets provided information on what fluke drench to use with young ewes under a year old ?  I'm used to using a triclabendazole based drench, so will need to rethink.


Foobar

  • Joined Mar 2012
  • South Wales
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2013, 12:22:50 pm »
I believe that that Fluke regs change is for milk producing animals only ... but it's not very clear ...

lachlanandmarcus

  • Joined Aug 2010
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2013, 01:03:22 pm »
Even the farmers on the farming forums are completely confused as to whether this just covers milking livestock or all young breeding females (in which case the question is do we just let em die of fluke instead or what)?

Calvadnack

  • Joined Jun 2009
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2013, 01:09:37 pm »
What have all the goatkeepers been told ?

Foobar

  • Joined Mar 2012
  • South Wales
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2013, 01:20:02 pm »
The full article is here: http://www.nfuonline.com/News/Important-changes-to-flukicide-regulation/ and it does list Goats in the table at the bottom.


I think it's trying to say that flukicides are not allowed to be used in any milk producing animals, or any animals intended for producing milk in the future (i.e no flukicide to be used on a sheep/goat for at least one year prior to initial milk production commencing).
« Last Edit: February 05, 2013, 01:26:47 pm by foobar »

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2013, 01:37:21 pm »
Is that routine fluke treatment a good thing even if your sheep fields are fairly dry and you haven't had any fluke issues in e last (eg re abattoir report/failing to thrive)?


Also today this came out...which might impact ability to use it in young breeding ewes?http://www.nfuonline.com/News/Important-changes-to-flukicide-regulation/

Our fields are wet, we've had evidence of fluke from the abattoir and our vet has advised to fluke twice a year.

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: vaccinations
« Reply #14 on: February 05, 2013, 01:52:12 pm »
I've been using Fasinex 10% for both cattle and sheep but I've looked at the regs. and had a look at the data sheets for the product and it says quite clearly that it's not to be used for dairy cows.

Now mine will in effect be dairy cows come summer when I start milking them for the house. So what can I use? Although cattle are less susceptible to the effects of fluke than sheep, they will host and spread them and I don't want to house my two cows for the whole of the winter.

Have emailed my vet to see what he thinks.

 
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