Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Real question, just curious  (Read 227 times)

Robb

  • Joined Oct 2019
Real question, just curious
« on: May 04, 2021, 08:07:42 pm »
I had a baby lamb this year and day after born found in morning with broken leg, mum is very affectionate, but late to first motherhood and bit of rough old girl!! Trampled or rolled her we think.

Anyway, took her to vet and had a cast, clean break, no muscle/tendon damage, and came off today vet hoping it wont need recasting, me too.

My question - what do people who live off their animals do?
This is my hobby and the couple of sheep (and now their lambs) are pets so vet bills just cost of my lifestyle and consequence of any pet accident, just like the dog might have.

But if I was living off my smallholding then any profit has long gone on existig vet bills, let alone any further intervention.
Would a real farmer have just splinted leg and hoped for the best?
Or, kill it as soon as broken leg discovered?

As I say just curious how people needing to live off their livestock manage?

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Real question, just curious
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2021, 08:52:54 pm »
Most farmers will give an animal a chance-vet bills are spread across the herd so the costing per animal is less. That said we’re mostly realistic that if an animal isn’t going to get better or is going to start costing a lot of money, that it is better to cull. I guess a lot of farmers would have splinted the leg themselves and given pain relief. A caesarean on a cow will wipe out any profit for 12 months even if you get a live calf, but we still do it on welfare grounds. Most farmers would not think twice.

« Last Edit: May 04, 2021, 08:56:10 pm by twizzel »

shep53

  • Joined Jan 2011
  • Dumfries & Galloway
Re: Real question, just curious
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2021, 05:59:56 pm »
Had a few broken legs over the years , one this year at  3 days old   back leg just above the joint  , no broken skin  , wrap in sheeps wool  ,plastic tube and horse bandage . 12 days later take of and fully healed . If there was broken skin or the break was very high up the leg / shoulder / hip  then beyond my abilities so vet .  Most farmers will try their best

Backinwellies

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Llandeilo Carmarthenshire
    • Nantygroes
    • Facebook
Re: Real question, just curious
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2021, 07:18:46 am »
The only difference really is that farmers/commercial type smallholders would probably euthanase a very sick animal  rather than give it a prolonged vet treatment hoping it would recover.   A straightforward broken leg on a lamb would be set by the farmer.
The euthanase decision will be commercially driven .... ie value of animal  to cost (in both time and money) to have long term vet treatment. .... but all farmers care deeply for their stock and the decision is never taken lightly.
Linda

Don't wrestle with pigs, they will love it and you will just get all muddy.

Let go of who you are and become who you are meant to be.

http://nantygroes.blogspot.co.uk/
www.nantygroes.co.uk
Nantygroes  facebook page

 

Practical help for newbies and the curious!

Started by PaulM (8.77)

Replies: 2
Views: 1674
Last post November 27, 2011, 12:27:16 am
by thenovice
Curious about feeding sheep yeast

Started by little bo peep (8.67)

Replies: 5
Views: 2684
Last post June 12, 2015, 11:27:45 pm
by little bo peep
an real surprise

Started by CarraghsBorderCollies (7.6)

Replies: 3
Views: 1644
Last post April 07, 2010, 04:44:15 pm
by little blue
Am I just bias, or is she a real looker?

Started by MissJackRussell (7.52)

Replies: 10
Views: 1237
Last post July 24, 2019, 06:33:07 pm
by MissJackRussell
A real beginner with sheep! At least I hope to be!

Started by llamakevin (7.44)

Replies: 8
Views: 3319
Last post August 07, 2011, 12:48:50 pm
by llamakevin

Forum sponsors

FibreHut Energy Helpline Thomson & Morgan Time for Paws Scottish Smallholder & Grower Festival Ark Farm Livestock Movement Service

© The Accidental Smallholder Ltd 2003-2021. All rights reserved.

Design by Furness Internet

Site developed by Champion IS