Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Haylage  (Read 1997 times)

Nelson International

  • Joined Aug 2017
Haylage
« on: March 15, 2018, 09:44:51 am »
How long will haylage last once itís unwrapped, and can you tell when itís gone bad?

I have had to shift from hay to haylage for a little while as I wanted to keep the last of my hay back for the ewes lambing indoors. I only have 6 sheep so rather than put a whole big bale out, Iíve had it unwrapped on a pallet in a dry stable, taking leaves of it out to the sheep. I want to make sure I know when itíll be no good. Cheers.

shep53

  • Joined Jan 2011
  • Dumfries & Galloway
Re: Haylage
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2018, 12:41:35 pm »
Could last a week or 2wks  depends how dry it is , if nearly hay then might   stretch to 3 wks . When you say unwrapped   ,have you removed all the plastic and net ?  it would last longer if you leave the wrap on and just open a side  and slowly peel back as you use the haylage .   If it starts to get warm  or starts to get dry ,then its at its limit

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Haylage
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2018, 12:53:02 pm »
Itís risky beyond four days, so try to keep it mostly well covered and only pull out of one place so the rest stays tight and air is pretty much excluded.

We can get small bales of haylage where we are - absolute godsend.  :relief:
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Nelson International

  • Joined Aug 2017
Re: Haylage
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2018, 08:32:54 pm »
Thanks, the advice I had was to keep it undercover but unwrap it completely to stop it sweating. It seems completely the same as when I unwrapped it, but I've been using it a couple of weeks now, so I think I'll quit while I still seem to be ahead. I have enough hay to last me I think.


Penninehillbilly

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • West Yorks
Re: Haylage
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2018, 12:29:08 am »
I get some quite dry, almost hay, used it for up to 3 weeks, for goats and sheep. Only one started to sweat a bit, I unwoun and loosened all that was left and it was fine.

bj_cardiff

  • Joined Feb 2017
  • Carmarthenshire
Re: Haylage
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2018, 08:55:37 am »
How long it will last depends on the haylage, if its very wet, or very dry it won't heat up as much. I find that if I keep it outside and leave uncovered (when its dry weather) it keeps it cooler. I used to keep in a barn and it used to sweat. If it starts to sweat, pull the whole bale apart and let it cool down

landroverroy

  • Joined Oct 2010
Re: Haylage
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2018, 09:53:08 am »
You'll know when it's off as it will no longer smell appetising and they will be loathe to eat it.
Rules are made:
  for the guidance of wise men
  and the obedience of fools.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Haylage
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2018, 10:41:19 am »
Iím not certain that every kind of Ďoffí makes it smell different and be unappetising. Some kinds of Ďoffí can poison the stock who eat it (and eat it they do) but all I can tell you is ex-BH used to be anal about not leaving silage that had been opened longer than a couple of days where the cattle could get at it.

I know thereís a risk of listeria if soil had got into the bale. But whether that risk is there no matter how the bale is treated, once it had soil in it, Iím not sure.  I think it might be that listeria needs air to breed, so if there are some there that are kept dormant by the anaerobic conditions, then once the silage is open to the air, the bacteria can start to breed. Perhaps it takes a few days for them to reach levels that can cause illness.

Anyway, Iím nervous about feeding haylage - especially if itís at the wetter end of the scale - more than four days after opening. 
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

shep53

  • Joined Jan 2011
  • Dumfries & Galloway
Re: Haylage
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2018, 12:38:41 pm »
Listeria is primarily soil borne and is incorporated  during silage making ,then if bales  poorly sealed  or plastic is damaged then fermentation is incomplete and then any punctures from animals /birds can allow it to multiply .     Pit or clamp silage  lasts  2-3 days  after feeding  as it is loose  , bales  can last up to 7 days  ( according to some advice )  as they are  a solid lump , Haylage is higher dm  with some being  hay that was not quite ready for hay  so should last a lot longer  .  Horsehage  suggest  5-7 days as  a max on its site .   The worst that can happen is secondary fermentation and the silage / haylage  starting to cook is the first sign

 

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