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Author Topic: Untreated larch for deer fencing?  (Read 6031 times)

Taliesin

  • Joined Aug 2016
Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« on: November 09, 2016, 08:34:46 am »
We are installing a post and wire fence around the boundary of our land to prevent the local red deer from feasting on a newly planted fruit trees. I've been offered some untreated hybrid larch, pointed and peeled for a good price. The option is to go for chestnut brought in at double the price. It's a big expense for us and I need to get it right to save money down the line. Anyone here with experience of using untreated larch in the round for fencing? How susceptible it is to rot, especially at the point where earth meets air?

bazzais

  • Joined Jan 2010
    • Allt Y Coed Farm and Campsite
Re: Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2016, 05:39:30 pm »
should last 8 or 9?

bloomer

  • Joined Aug 2010
  • leslie, fife
  • i have chickens, sheep and opinions!!!
Re: Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2016, 07:52:28 pm »
Pressure treated pine in contact with earth in even vaguely damp conditions is more like 7-10 years.




mab

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • carmarthenshire
Re: Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2016, 11:27:20 pm »
you can get pressure treated with creosote which claim 25years (fence n forget and jacksons, IIRC) - though they're about 3 times the price of regular pressure-treated posts. As for the regular (green) pressure treated - I think countrywide were offering some with 15year guarantee? - can't seem to access their website ATM though so can't check. Or there's the cheap & cheerful pressure treated from the local agri-merchant - which start to go within 5 years here in wales.

Foobar

  • Joined Mar 2012
  • South Wales
Re: Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2016, 11:01:38 am »
I read a forestry commission document about using untreated posts ... I'll try and dig it out.

Foobar

  • Joined Mar 2012
  • South Wales
Re: Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2016, 11:10:36 am »
Here:  http://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/fctg002.pdf/$FILE/fctg002.pdf


They talk about using untreated timber as temporary fencing as it's available on site.  There is a table on page 5 which lists the durability of untreated heartwood of different species.  Larch is moderately durable at 10-15 years.  Note that this is heartwood though - the sap wood will only last 2-5 years, if that.  So it depends on the posts in question really.


This is something that I've been thinking about as I am cutting several larch trees and was thinking if I could cut myself some fencing poles for temporarily fencing.

Taliesin

  • Joined Aug 2016
Re: Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2016, 04:31:35 am »
Thanks for the responses. Having investigated further I'm reluctant to go the pressure treated spruce root. Apparently the new treatments used, even though better on the environment, don't penetrate the timber so well. Regarding larch, without using creosote (which I won't do) the hybrid larch will have a significantly shorter life in the ground. In the end I've chosen to for with untreated chestnut. It's double the price of the spruce though should last a long time in the ground untreated. It's not a job I wish to do again if I can help it.


bazzais

  • Joined Jan 2010
    • Allt Y Coed Farm and Campsite
Re: Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2016, 03:36:50 pm »
Modern pressure treated timber is only lasting me about 3 years before rotting.

Yes its safer for the environment - but hell they need to cut down alot of trees to keep up. ;)

bazzais

  • Joined Jan 2010
    • Allt Y Coed Farm and Campsite
Re: Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2016, 03:37:48 pm »
Stand the posts in creosote and engine oil before use. :)

cloddopper

  • Joined Jun 2013
  • South Wales .Carmarthenshire. SA18
Re: Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2017, 09:18:10 pm »
Modern pressure treated timber is only lasting me about 3 years before rotting.

Yes its safer for the environment - but hell they need to cut down alot of trees to keep up. ;)

 Those post 3 to 9 inch dia poles  are forest thinning cuts more often than not so it's not as desperate as it first appears .
Strong belief , triggers the mind to find the way ... Dyslexia just makes it that bit more amusing & interesting

regen

  • Joined Jan 2013
Re: Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2017, 06:10:36 am »
" Those post 3 to 9 inch dia poles  are forest thinning cuts more often than not so it's not as desperate as it first appears ."

Not here in the Brechfa forest area- they clear fell the lot and if no good for fenceposts then they wrap the lot like a xmas tree cut it into 12 ft lengths and send it for biomass- wonder what the energy conversion is if they burn this stuff green!

Regen

Steph Hen

  • Joined Jul 2013
  • Angus Scotland.
Re: Untreated larch for deer fencing?
« Reply #11 on: January 08, 2017, 07:06:56 pm »
" - wonder what the energy conversion is if they burn this stuff green!

Regen

A few years ago a friend of mine I was living with went lambing on a craft on one of the Hebrides. After bottle feeding the stragglers, months later they were sent for biomass because it wasn't going to be worth rearing and finishing them for meat. She and the farmer were pretty sad and everyone struggled to believe you could make energy from burning dead sheep (surely the energy needed to dry out the matter would be more than that gained!?!) but apparently so.

 

Deer fencing - options, heights etc etc

Started by MikeM (12.87)

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