NFU Mutual Smallholding Insurance

Author Topic: Trees for the farm  (Read 203 times)

aboud

  • Joined Jul 2017
Trees for the farm
« on: December 07, 2017, 08:56:54 am »
Morning all,

Earlier this year we opened up a small farm for young people with disabilities.

We currently have sheep, goats, donkeys, pigs, guniea pigs, ducks and chickens.  We are now hoping to do a bit of landscaping and work on the appearance of the farm.

Would anyone be able to recommend some trees that would be suitable for planting around the farm?
Obviously nothing poisonous to any of the above!

Thanks, Alex   

Foobar

  • Joined Mar 2012
  • South Wales
Re: Trees for the farm
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2017, 10:03:54 am »
Plant something that you can do something with - i.e. coppice - hazel willow etc etc.  Plus also something with flowers or berries for the wildlife.  Check out the woodland trust's website, there is lots of info there - you might even be able to get some help with funding from them.

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: Trees for the farm
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2017, 12:23:35 pm »
Do you have room for hedgerows?  They are of such benefit to wildlife if you choose the right species, especially if they can join up with neighbouring woody areas.  Children can learn so much from hedges and maybe even see some bird nests once the plants have grown a bit.  When we planted up our trees, we chose native species, and included a few which will eventually grow into full sized trees, such as oak, ash, Scots pine, beech.  We also have smaller trees such as rowan, elder, holly, wild cherry. birch, hazel and so on. For the hedges, these trees are included, well spaced out, but left to grow above the hedgetop, or cut along with the hedges themselves.  The main hedge species are made up of 50% hawthorn, with hornbeam, beech, various wild roses, field maple, spindle, and so on - no willow in hedges.  We recently planted a dozen junipers in our 'wildlife strip', as they are a tree native to our area but there are hardly any wild ones left.


Many of our trees are from acorns and holly etc which children have grown from seed, then not known where to plant them out.  Your visitors would love to do that.  Currently we are trying to work out how to get four 8' tall conker trees, in 2' buckets, up here from the south of England.  My youngest grandson planted them a few years ago and now wants them to be here.  The half grown conker we have was grown by his dad, our younger son, when he was a child - it's lovely to have history attached to your trees.



There is nothing which grows fast enough to become large within a few years except willow, but something like a weeping willow would provide a 'house' for children to play in in years to come.
Something else you could plant would be a willow bower for playing in and picnicking, maybe with a 'secret' entrance - all fun, but you do need to keep them under control - the willows that is.


Would you also want to grow some fruit, such as apple trees, and raspberries, so the children could pick and eat them on the spot?
www.scothebs.co.uk

'A lawsuit is a machine where you go in as a pig and come out as sausages'

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SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Trees for the farm
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2017, 02:12:11 pm »
We'd love to do more hedgerows here...  One day...

@Fleecewife, I love  :love: :tree: spindle but had understood it was quite toxic to livestock.  Is yours restricted to the wildlife area?
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: Trees for the farm
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2017, 03:46:09 pm »
I didn't know it's toxic Sally but serendipitously it's not in any bits the sheep can reach.  At the moment it's got its amazing neon pink and orange seeds and calyces showing.  I can never believe they are really colours from nature, but maybe She feels like being psychedelic sometimes  ;D
www.scothebs.co.uk

'A lawsuit is a machine where you go in as a pig and come out as sausages'

Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Trees for the farm
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2017, 04:39:52 pm »
Exactly!  That's why I love it :)
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Backinwellies

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Llandeilo Carmarthenshire
    • Nantygroes
    • Facebook
Re: Trees for the farm
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2017, 07:24:04 am »
Check out the woodland Trust site Sally  .... lots of info there  and tree packs for sale
Linda

Don't wrestle with pigs, they will love it and you will just get all muddy.

Let go of who you are and become who you are meant to be.

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