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Author Topic: Any ideas? I think it's something that I've seeded from a herbal grazing mix...  (Read 1605 times)

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Based on the spread across my fields, I suspect these have come out of the herbal grazing mix I spread a couple of years ago.  They're not one of the listed species, I've checked all of those on google, but there is a reference to 'various herbs' as a minor constituent...

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Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
It's yellow rattle, which I think parasitises grass - not ideal for grazing pasture maybe.
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YorkshireLass

  • Joined Mar 2010
Yep, it parasitises grass and is often used in mixes to weaken grass cover and allow other plants to gain a foothold. It seems to vary a lot in coverage, year by year.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Yes, yellow rattle.  If you want plenty of broad leaved plants in among the grass, let it be, as it weakens the grasses by parasitising them.  If you want good thick monocots, might be worth removing the seed heads ;)
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Backinwellies

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  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Llandeilo Carmarthenshire
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yellow rattle .... used to get rid of competing grass in wild flower meadows ....   we had to hand pick off all heads across 4 acres to rid ourselves of it 2 years ago (and it works)
Linda

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Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Ok good to know.  In that case it's definitely likely it came in the seed bag and was probably unnamed because of it's bad reputation with farmers.  The animals seem to eat it ok both in the paddock and hay so I'll let it be.  If it reduces the clover in the field and allows some of the other grasses a look in I'll be happy.

Thanks everyone!
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

Backinwellies

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Llandeilo Carmarthenshire
    • Nantygroes
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It reduces grass growth .... I personally wouldn't want my animals to eat it and speed the seed...
Linda

Don't wrestle with pigs, they will love it and you will just get all muddy.

Let go of who you are and become who you are meant to be.

http://nantygroes.blogspot.co.uk/
www.nantygroes.co.uk
Nantygroes  facebook page

Penninehillbilly

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • West Yorks
This is interesting, looks like the seed heads I've found in hay and I've been curious.
Here's hoping the goats ferment it well.  :)

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
This is interesting, looks like the seed heads I've found in hay and I've been curious.


Likley to be nice meadow hay, then, with lots of beneficial broadleaved plants in it too. :thumbsup:
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
One of the reasons I've been overseeding the paddocks here since I moved in is to move from "improved" (read species deficient) predominantly clover grassland to "species rich" (read weedy with a diversity of mineral nutrients) meadow.  The hay has improved year on year to be softer, browner and sweeter... 
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

 

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