Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Help  (Read 1921 times)

sabrina

  • Joined Nov 2008
Help
« on: March 11, 2017, 08:31:56 pm »
Myself and my Shetland ponies are been driven crazy with hay mites. I get my hay in big round bales. I always start the winter with the years before hay so it was Christmas when I got a load of 2016 made hay. I react very badly to hay mites and have damaged skin from past years. Anyone know what I can use on myself and what would help the ponies.

Buttermilk

  • Joined Jul 2014
Re: Help
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2017, 07:01:42 am »
I would steam the hay to kill the mites before feeding, although proper hay steamers cost a fortune.  I also munch antihistamines to reduce the reaction I get from them.  Dectomax injection to kill the mites that are on the ponies.

Charlie1234

  • Joined Feb 2017
  • Powys
Re: Help
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2017, 08:36:56 pm »
You could try Nettles .. Nettles contain Histamine + Formic Acid and they are FREE!!

Simply pick a few leaves,put in a jug add boiling water as if making tea and let it steep,when cool enough apply to your skin + to the Ponies.

If there are no nettles around you can buy nettle teabags in Holland + barrett or other health stores.

You can also freeze the leaves to use through the winter months,i do when im handling lots of Hay to feed the sheep.
5 Dogs,5 cats,40 chickens,2badger faced sheep + a full freezer

Penninehillbilly

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • West Yorks
Re: Help
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2017, 09:24:20 pm »
Never heard of hay mites, looked it up. That probably explains why my face is itchy sometimes when I've fed the goats.thought it was dust but this more likely.

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Help
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2017, 08:14:30 pm »
I'm old school.... I never feed hay the same year it was made, and if I can get it to 2 year old before feeding all the better.  Hay mites help with the curing process, you generally know they're 'done' when there is dust on the hay shed floor (which normally starts around new year for me).  That dust used to be collected and sold as itching powder in joke shops...

You could try soaking the hay if you can't steam it, then you have to hang it to drain and not all horses will eat it once soaked.

You shouldn't still be having problems with hay mites though... March is definitely late for them to still be active!  I'd question if it's dust rather than the mites themselves at this time of year, in which case a dust mask a boiler suit and give the hay a good thrashing before putting it in the hayrack/nets.
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

landroverroy

  • Joined Oct 2010
Re: Help
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2017, 10:31:24 pm »
I get it every year in winter with both my cattle and equines. One treatment of Ivomec (or similar) pour on sorts it. I just treated my cattle, donkeys and mule yesterday. Have never actually been affected myself (to my knowledge). But I did notice I had a few small bites on my wrist after treating them, so could have been a few of the mites baling out.
Rules are made:
  for the guidance of wise men
  and the obedience of fools.

sheeponthebrain

  • Joined Feb 2016
  • Turriff
Re: Help
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2017, 07:21:35 am »
The simple way to cut down on how mites on the horses is to feed at ground level that way they won't be pulling the hay downwards and getting mites landing on them.

landroverroy

  • Joined Oct 2010
Re: Help
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2017, 10:39:49 am »
Mine all feed at ground level but still get them.
Rules are made:
  for the guidance of wise men
  and the obedience of fools.

landroverroy

  • Joined Oct 2010
Re: Help
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2017, 11:18:04 am »
I'm old school.... I never feed hay the same year it was made, and if I can get it to 2 year old before feeding all the better.  Hay mites help with the curing process, you generally know they're 'done' when there is dust on the hay shed floor (which normally starts around new year for me).  That dust used to be collected and sold as itching powder in joke shops...

You could try soaking the hay if you can't steam it, then you have to hang it to drain and not all horses will eat it once soaked.

You shouldn't still be having problems with hay mites though... March is definitely late for them to still be active!  I'd question if it's dust rather than the mites themselves at this time of year, in which case a dust mask a boiler suit and give the hay a good thrashing before putting it in the hayrack/nets.

I think you'll find that you're referring to different mites here SD.
The ones that are a nuisance in winter turn up in stored hay and straw, usually in winter and spring. Look up "hay/straw itch mites." They are a common problem at this time of year.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 12:17:55 pm by landroverroy »
Rules are made:
  for the guidance of wise men
  and the obedience of fools.

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Help
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2017, 10:05:13 pm »
I'm old school.... I never feed hay the same year it was made, and if I can get it to 2 year old before feeding all the better.  Hay mites help with the curing process, you generally know they're 'done' when there is dust on the hay shed floor (which normally starts around new year for me).  That dust used to be collected and sold as itching powder in joke shops...

You could try soaking the hay if you can't steam it, then you have to hang it to drain and not all horses will eat it once soaked.

You shouldn't still be having problems with hay mites though... March is definitely late for them to still be active!  I'd question if it's dust rather than the mites themselves at this time of year, in which case a dust mask a boiler suit and give the hay a good thrashing before putting it in the hayrack/nets.

I think you'll find that you're referring to different mites here SD.
The ones that are a nuisance in winter turn up in stored hay and straw, usually in winter and spring. Look up "hay/straw itch mites." They are a common problem at this time of year.

No, we're talking about the same thing.  I guess maybe the location is the difference?  Hay mites are generally active in warm and 'sweaty' conditions... I'm in a relatively dry corner of the country (although we've been deluged this year) and we seldom get temperatures conducive to them surviving for more than a couple of months after hay cut.  Once the bales cool down and they've worked their way through the hay, they land up as dust on the floor (normally around the turn of the year here).  There's no problem with them thereafter.  This winter may be an exception as it hasn't really been that cold...
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

 

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