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Author Topic: Unusual insect identification  (Read 371 times)

Eeyore77

  • Joined Jan 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Unusual insect identification
« on: August 03, 2020, 04:30:53 pm »
Hello we were hill walking today at clachnaben in Aberdeenshire and one of my boys spotted this. It was about half the length of a mans little finger but about the same thickness.
As it was on the path I moved it with a leaf to stop it getting trampled and when it was touched it flew off.
Any idea what it is?
Thanks.

Womble

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • Stirlingshire, Central Scotland
Re: Unusual insect identification
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2020, 08:04:56 pm »
It looks a bit like a hornet, but the legs and feelers aren't quite right:


https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/trees-woods-and-wildlife/animals/bees-wasps-and-ants/hornet/
"All fungi are edible. Some fungi are only edible once." -Terry Pratchett

DippyEgg

  • Joined May 2017
Re: Unusual insect identification
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2020, 08:18:18 pm »
We had these, or very similar ones, in a tree and thought they were Asian hornets. I reported it and sent a photo. Turned out they are not hornets, but I can't remember what they are called. Harmless though.

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: Unusual insect identification
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2020, 10:33:37 pm »
Some sort of wood wasp?  It has what looks like a strong ovipositor.


Google 'wood wasps scotland' and there it is, with a picture - The giant horntail is a massive sawfly that is also known as the 'giant woodwasp' or 'greater horntail'. A relative of the wasps, the female is black and yellow and has a long, stinger-like tail that is actually her ovipositor, which she uses to lay her eggs into wood, particularly pine.



Giant horntail | The Wildlife Trusts


Good guess or what  8)   :sunshine: An excellent find @Eeyore77 Congratulations to your eagle-eyed son  :trophy:
« Last Edit: August 03, 2020, 10:41:54 pm by Fleecewife »
www.scothebs.co.uk

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus - let sleeping dragons lie

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Unusual insect identification
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2020, 11:53:19 pm »
Wood wasp was my first thought.
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

Womble

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • Stirlingshire, Central Scotland
Re: Unusual insect identification
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2020, 07:29:30 am »
Yay, well done both of you!  I'd never heard of a wood wasp before.

I was starting to think it was a giant nopefly after all!
"All fungi are edible. Some fungi are only edible once." -Terry Pratchett

harmony

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: Unusual insect identification
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2020, 09:02:59 am »
We get wood wasps. They land on the horses sometimes and they are not best pleased which can be interesting.

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Unusual insect identification
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2020, 09:37:49 am »
I'd never heard of them until I worked in an ironmongers many, many years ago now and one came into the shop.  I was very impressed that the owner caught it in his hands put it in a glass for us all to have a look at while he explained about it and then took it out the back to release it in the garden

Now at that time I was terrified of anything that buzzed having been badly stung by yellowjackets as a child.  I recall our dogs digging up a hornet's nest whilst I was walking a cross country course and whilst my mother was there raking them out of the dogs coats with her bare hands I'd run a good couple of hundred yards before collapsing into a jellied heap sobbing.  Both dogs needed vet treatment for stings (one had been stung very close to the eyes and the other in the nose and mouth), my mother didn't get stung once, and I got 4 stings from running away!  I've managed to gradually conquer my fear and can now pick up a bumble bee (yes I know they're the labradors of buzzing things but it's still progress)!

Wood wasps look immensely vicious with the "huge sting" thing which actually isn't a sting at all.  According to the shopkeeper, they're actually quite placid creatures who were more afraid of us than we were of them... I'm not sure he was right on that one where I was concerned though!
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

Eeyore77

  • Joined Jan 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Unusual insect identification
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2020, 10:42:54 am »
Thanks Everyone,
I’ve never heard of a Giant Horntail before. We thought perhaps it’s some sort of huge hornet as it looked pretty intimidating, but just goes to show that looks aren’t everything.
On the drive back down over the Cairn O’Mount he spotted a Red Kite hanging in the air a few yards out from the road where the hill drops down to the bottom of the glen. So he’s got a good eye for nature (obviously he can’t spot dog/sheep/chicken poo/cow pats where he’s walking though, but I guess that they aren’t so interesting!).
Cheerio.

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: Unusual insect identification
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2020, 11:46:03 am »
When our children were small we lived in St Andrews, which is near to Tentsmuir forest, full of pine trees, perfect for an insect which lays its eggs in wood.  One of those things landed on the wall of our house. Our sons being wildlife crazy were absolutely fascinated, as were we all, so we identified it then, but I wasn't initially sure if yours was totally the same @Eeyore77 - it's a long time ago since I saw our one!
My younger son went on to study Zoology at Uni, so perhaps his early interest will spark a similar future for your boy. (The red kites at Cairn o' Mount are famous - good spot!)
www.scothebs.co.uk

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus - let sleeping dragons lie

 

Snake Identification

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