Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Swollen udder  (Read 1043 times)

Christian

  • Joined Jun 2012
Swollen udder
« on: March 31, 2021, 06:50:07 pm »
Hi Folks,

one of my 6 year old multiparous girls (saanen, tog and postman mix) has developed quite a big, uneven sized udder during late pregnancy (photo attached). Never painful, never warm and always soft. She has now been kidding and is feeding her two kids well. Do I need to get a vet involved?

Happy kidding!

Christian

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Swollen udder
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2021, 07:32:17 pm »
How long ago did she kid?  If it's more than a few days and if the kids are feeding well from both sides and she's not getting hot/hard, then it sounds normal.  If the kids are feeding from one side, it may indicate a problem on the other side (plug may not have come out of the teat or there could be historic scarring from mastitis etc).  Hard spots on the udder could indicate blockages, mastitis (including old scar tissue) or bruises from the kids "dunting" the udder for her to drop milk.  If she's producing more than they need then milk her out and use it as house milk.  You can do a mastitis test using a drop of washing up liquid (not the lemon version).  The more you milk the more she'll produce providing you feed her an appropriate amount.  Not all girls have perfectly shaped and equal udders!
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

Christian

  • Joined Jun 2012
Re: Swollen udder
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2021, 06:29:30 am »
Hi Scarlet.Dragon;

thanks for quick reply! She's been kidding 2 days ago. Good idea to check the milk - I was trying to find some testing kit on the net, but they all seem to be American (much better with washing up liquid!).

And yes, milking her out might be good - I need to freeze some colostrum away anyway (too early for house milk). She's not a keen milker, though.....

I'll see, how it goes - thanks!

Christian

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Swollen udder
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2021, 10:00:12 am »
OK it's very early days in terms of udders then and you're right 2 days is too early for house milk although you're getting late for taking colostrum for the freezer!

Check the plugs have come out of both teats, have a small amount of milk in a dish and add some washing up liquid.  If it congeals it's showing signs of mastitis if it just separates it's fine... I would think it would be too early to show mastitis this soon after kidding unless she'd had a problem before she kidded.

It's early days and she'll be sore, so I'm not surprised she's not keen.  If she's jumping around too much, stand her against a wall, tie her head short and high and tie a back leg above the hock at the other end (the one nearest you not the wall).  It'll help to keep her relatively still whilst you milk.  Personally I wouldn't milk her out completely at this stage, just be sure you've got a decent clean flow coming out of each teat.  You may get "strawberry milk" if she's burst blood vessels in the udder.  It's nothing to worry about and is common straight after kidding.

Good luck!
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

Festus

  • Joined Jan 2019
Re: Swollen udder
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2021, 07:01:43 pm »
Hi,

May I piggy back onto this swollen udder thread.  Same subject, different circumstances.  My 8 year old nanny has suddenly developed a very big udder, one side slightly bigger than the other, but soft.  She last kidded 4 years ago.  She seems fine in herself but they do look very large.  Has anyone any experience of this or suggestions about what this could be?

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Swollen udder
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2021, 08:33:43 pm »
If there is absolutely no chance that she managed to get herself "up the duff", then she may either be cloudbursting (but she probably would look quite big as well) or she has just simply come into milk. No harm in milking some out, to check for mastitis (each quarter separately - use washing up liquid and see if it goes gooo-ey foe ant of a better word). Also check for heat, redness and any lumps - all of which indicate mastitis.

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Swollen udder
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2021, 11:26:40 pm »
You don't say where you are Festus but if you've got fresh grass coming through she may have 'flushed' into milk as Anke suggests...

One of mine seems to have managed this and it's certainly wishful thinking in relation to Dr Green where she's concerned, as I think we're probably still a good fortnight off seeing actual green stuff growing!!!!   Mine aren't milkers and I don't get much from them at the best of times, but this one is determined to give me an extra job twice a week at the moment!  Not to worry, all the best things come in small quantities as they say!
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

Festus

  • Joined Jan 2019
Re: Swollen udder
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2021, 12:23:28 pm »
Thanks for your replies.  Although we are in Somerset Scarlet Dragon we haven't had any rain for weeks so new grass is in short supply.  It is actually becoming quite a worry.  Her udder was not hot or hard when I felt it but I didn't think to try and milk her because it never occurred to me she might be in milk.  I will try and she if she is.  What is 'cloud bursting' Anke?  Should I be worried?   :raining:

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Swollen udder
« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2021, 04:55:35 pm »
Cloud bursting is a phantom pregnancy, and some goats do it more than others. The goat will think she has kidded, it can go the normal length of pregnancy or longer, and she normally "bursst" and you will find a goat with a very wet back end one morning. You usually see her belly getting bigger and an udder does develop, though not always very much. They often do produce milk, but not as much as after a normal pregnancy. If she is from a heavy milking line you may get appreciable amounts of milk, but I have usually found it is not worth milking them after a few days.


But if her udder is still getting bigger and you are sure she is not in kid, then I would definitely see what's going on and take some milk (or whatever the liquid is inside) off her.


Also if you do not want her to be in milk - no concentrates is the answer.

Festus

  • Joined Jan 2019
Re: Swollen udder
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2021, 05:06:14 pm »
Thanks Anke.  She is looking larger than normal. Iíll investigate further

 

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