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Author Topic: Getting a second (younger) dog....  (Read 365 times)

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Getting a second (younger) dog....
« on: December 28, 2021, 03:53:52 pm »
We are planning to add a second dog to our (now reduced to empty nester size) family, thinking about another lab, a dog again. I have only ever had one dog at a time, so some questions wrt planning ahead. The age gap will be 4 years, older boy is castrated, younger one will be in due course.


Do dogs with that age gap share a bed/crate at night? I would have to have a major furniture re-arrangement in our living room to create the space for two lab sized crates, so a joint bed (or single larger crate) would be much easier. Currently dog sleeps in crate at night time, but maybe we can just get him a basket instead.


Do you feed them in different rooms (which is possible)?


How do people do introductions, as in keep them separate at the beginning and/or supervise all the time? Current dog is very friendly, probably not very dominant (at least with dogs his own size), so I am hoping he would love to have a mate around.

Buttermilk

  • Joined Jul 2014
Re: Getting a second (younger) dog....
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2021, 04:58:44 pm »
A lot depends on the dogs as to sharing beds.  Initially work as if they will not.  When I introduce a new dog I will crate for the start overningt until I know that they will get on and are housetrained.  I also get a dog of the opposite sex to the incumbent dog, the rescue I get from recommend doing this.

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: Getting a second (younger) dog....
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2021, 05:13:13 pm »
We don't crate our dogs but when we got our new pup earlier this year he slept in his carrying bag at first until I was sure Sophie wasn't going to kill him.  We didn't try to push them to develop a relationship, especially as Sophie had only ever been with her mum Mia before.  Initially Sophie hated Brodie, which lasted about a week, but it's hard to hate a friendly pup so in no time they were playing together, but not sharing a bed.  I made sure that they had separate beds to call their own.  Now 6 months later, Sophie will either allow Brodie to share her bed or she won't, but it's up to her to decide and Brodie respects that.  The two dogs are the very best of pals, but I think that if we had tried to force them to share a bed then that could well not have happened. A dog's bed is its personal space.


How old is your new dog Anke?  If he's a pup, my advice would be to leave the older dog as king of his own crate and get the pup used to sleeping in a bed, perhaps starting with a small crate until he's fully trained. If he's an adult, I would give them separate crates for safety when you're not there.  Later once they have settled, leave the crate doors open so they can choose where to sleep and whether to share or not, perhaps with the option of a bed each for later.  I wouldn't change the older dogs crate for a bed at the same time as getting a new dog.
"Let's not talk about what we can do, but do what we can"

There is NO planet B - what are YOU doing to save our home?

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

 Love your soil - it's the lifeblood of your land.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Getting a second (younger) dog....
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2021, 05:50:22 pm »
Great advice from everyone, not sure I have much to add.  Except that personally I much prefer same sex, if one is planning on being out and about with them.  The male can get very protective of "his bitch" (whether he's neutered or not), which can cause angst with other dogs.  But if they will only be on your holding and you don't get many or any canine visitors, then that wouldn't be an issue.

Other advice is to reinforce that the incumbent is top dog by your behaviour - so feed current dog first, insist on new dog waiting to be invited for fuss and don't let him push the current dog out of the way, don't evict current dog from his bed, or make him share his toys or anything.  They will sort themselves out in due course, but it will help the incumbent accept the newcomer in his space if you treat him like Top Dog, and reduce the amount of posturing they feel the need to do for the first wee while. 

If you are getting a pup, chances are it will all evolve just fine.  If you are getting a young adult (eg a rescue), it should be possible to introduce them away from your home site first, and see how they seem to get on.  If there is instant antipathy, that maybe isn't the dog for you.  Mostly it won't be instant love (though it might), but you can often see if there is likely to be a problem.  Two bitches who won't get on can be a huge problem, it's not usually quite so bad with boys - but it can still be something that erodes your ability to relax in your own home!  Much depends on the character of the existing dog - does he like to be Top Dog in all his encounters, or is he very laid back? 
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

mab

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • carmarthenshire
Re: Getting a second (younger) dog....
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2021, 06:22:41 pm »
There's probably not much point in overplanning for the introduction as you can't really know what to do 'til you start. If you're the 'boss' then you can 'interrupt' if the existing dog is grumbling and let him know he's expected to put up with the newcomer. Similarly,  I might initially interrupt a boisterous puppy before the other dog gets too irritated.


I'd introduce the new dog much as I would a visiting dog - with the view that the original dog is going to keep his bed and be 1st to be fed etc. They'll sort things out as time goes on.


I started with one bitch (choc lab, then 7yrs old, unspayed) and added a border collie bitch puppy about 22 months ago, and then about 12 months ago I added a 12yr old (spayed) yorkie bitch and a cat when my mum went into a care home. All this whilst living in a small caravan. The dogs sleep on the floor more or less together. When feeding I feed together but give food 1st to the greedy choc lab, then the yorkie and then the collie - ie in order of food dominance. But initially had to step in and remind the lab she couldn't just muscle in on another dogs food. The day may come when the now 2yr old (still unspayed) collie might make a bid for dominance but for now they get on fine.


doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
  • Qui? Moi?
    • ABERDON GUNDOGS for work and show
    • Facebook
Re: Getting a second (younger) dog....
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2021, 06:23:40 pm »
I have had a lot of dogs in my 78 years.  Only once when I was a child had I only one
When I add a new dog to whatever number it gets its own crate - for its protection/safety/rest

Puppies need to have quiet time away from other animals and humans, to prevent them getting overexcited.

There should be no need to feed in separate rooms with labs but be aware a puppy eats different food (extra proteins and nutrition from an adult) so your older dog will try to steal it unless they are supervised.  The pup will also need four meals at first, then three up to six months, then down to two

As to which sex, I never advise having two of the same sex with some breeds, but labs should be ok.  Your older one will definitely try to keep the younger one in his place though

Have you budgeted for your new addition?  My sister bought a lab bitch pup a couple of months ago and her price was 1800, not a huge price in today's market - I expected a lot more with her breeding (Champion sire, top winning dam)

Apart from price, ensure you see the pup with its mother and see at least photos of the sire, and check the pup's parents on the kennel club website for recommended diseases
These are my two dogs -Tom, (who will be hip scored next month and that will then show on this website) https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/search/dog-profile/?dogId=e3ea45a5-eb07-eb11-a813-0022480078c7

and Missy (her hips were x-rayed at almost a year and a half. 6 years ago )
https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/search/dog-profile/?dogId=504c973b-fe7b-e911-a8ad-002248005544

You only need to enter the first part of the dog's registered name(affix), but you then have to scroll thorough to find the  correct dog

Good luck, if you want any breeders names let me know
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Getting a second (younger) dog....
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2021, 08:16:16 pm »
Thanks for all the answers above. I have contacted the breeder of my current dog (kennel club registered, fully health checked, and she shows her dogs all over the country, but sells her dogs as pets mostly, which is what we want), and have joined her waiting list for sometime in 2022. I am very pleased with our current boy, and would hopefully get one of similar temperament.


I will keep my eyes peeled for a second crate then, and we will just have to sort out our living room furniture... (after all the space-sapping teenagers have left home...).


And yes, I realise that I am looking at 2k price probably... I am starting to save up now...

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: Getting a second (younger) dog....
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2021, 08:24:44 pm »
I just had a thought about your space problem Anke. I can't remember if you have a table in your main room; when we got our 2 giant Wolfie X Karabash pups, we built a cage using the table, chicken wire panels around the edge against the legs, one hinged at one end for access.  It worked well at keeping the German Shepherd out, the 2 giant pups in and preventing bloodshed at night.  The table did get chewed up a bit, but then so did the whole kitchen including the walls, but the table was only an IKEA old one anyway and it was a quick and cheap interim measure until they were all able to mix and the pups stopped chewing. 
Oh by the way, those space sapping teenagers have a tendency to come back, plus 1 or 2 extras - be warned  :o :thinking:
"Let's not talk about what we can do, but do what we can"

There is NO planet B - what are YOU doing to save our home?

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

 Love your soil - it's the lifeblood of your land.

in the hills

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: Getting a second (younger) dog....
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2021, 08:15:38 pm »
Is there a reason that your lab needs to sleep in a crate now? A chewer maybe?


If there is no reason then you could get the older boy used to sleeping in a bed now instead of his crate. If he settles to this ok then only pup will need a crate and that may help solve the space issue.


Crates are useful for pups in many ways eg until house trained, safe space away from the older dog when you can't supervise, avoiding little pup being stepped on if older boy is excited to see you first thing in the morning


Never had any issues regarding having the same sex of labradors or having mixed sexes. They tend to be pretty sensible and get on with each other as long as they are brought up properly. Never had any issues with a male being aggressive to other dogs when I've had mixed sexes either.




Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Getting a second (younger) dog....
« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2021, 09:15:41 pm »
The crate is still in use out of habit, he sometimes also retreats into it (door open) for some peace and quiet, though not often anymore. We do shut the door on the crate during the night, but again, just habit. I do find the crate useful if someone comes to the house and as he is friendly (not much use as a guard dog...) it means I can leave him in the crate if the person is not that keen on dogs. Again doesn't happen very often.


I do have a smaller crate (fox terrier size from the previous dog) which worked well for Bentley when he was a puppy, so initially we will be fine anyway.


The idea from Fleecewife is quite a good one, but we may be better initially remove one of our tables (currently using two Ikea tables together as one large dining table) to have more room (we have kitchen/dining and living area all open plan, and more or less direct access to outside - another reason why crate needed until re-call is good enough).

 

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