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Food & crafts => Crafts => Topic started by: norfolk newbies on January 03, 2013, 06:53:36 pm

Title: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: norfolk newbies on January 03, 2013, 06:53:36 pm
Hi All
I have got my Christmas present from In- Laws and it is MIL's old spinning wheel and some 1970 books ( weaving books mostly) and hand carders. She has unfortunately forgotten most of what she knew so I cannot rely on her for info.
We have our own fleece ( lincoln longwool) and I am looking forward to getting to starting to spin ( once I have found a bit of space/time to wash the stored fleece).
I am sure that there was something on here  ( or a link to)  identifying your spinning wheel. Can someone point me in the correct direction, and also let me know whether the type of spinning wheel matters or whether they all 'work' in the same way.
 
Also wheel has been in the attic for a while ( decades!) is there anything I need to do to 'restore' it?? It looks OK, but I am guessing it probably needs some TLC.
 
I am looking to join the local spinners and weavers (Lincs) group when I have a bit more time (HA HA...I wish), but at the moment I am just wanting to read up and get used to what does what....
 
thanks
Jo
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: Mad Goatwoman of Madeley on January 03, 2013, 10:43:43 pm
Wow, what a wonderful present.  And what a lovely MIL to give it to you.  Happy spinning.
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: jaykay on January 03, 2013, 10:56:29 pm
I think it was more that if you could show us photos, between us we might well know what it is..

The chances are the wood will need oiling and so will all the joints. But that's not a big deal.

Wheels are basically either scotch tension (single drive) or double drive. This is to do with how the yarn pulling onto the bobbin is controlled.

all about spinning wheels (http://joyofhandspinning.com/how-the-spinning-wheel-works/)

This is a good website to start learning from.

Post some photos and we'll be able to tell you more.

How exciting  ;D
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: Fleecewife on January 04, 2013, 12:12:20 am
Good present  ;D .  As Sally says, see if you can post us some pics of the wheel on here.  If your MiL bought it new in the '70s then it's likely to be an Ashford Traddy, single treadle, Scotch tension.  If so, then just about everyone knows how to use one so you will get plenty of advice.
For how to renovate it, Dans may also be able to help as she has restored the one of similar vintage that my aunt gave her.  Sally has done several too of course.
You may need to clean the wood before you start Danish oiling it (or you could lacquer it, but Danish oil is much more satisfying and makes the wheel feel loved  :) ) .  I'm not sure how best to clean it as it depends on what is making it dirty.  If it's just the years stored in the attic then something simple will do, but if your MiL used unwashed fleece then there could be years of dirty lanolin to clean off first.

You might also want to fit a new synthetic driveband (Scottish Fibres and Winghamwoolwork sell them) and a new piece of fishing line for the tensioner.  The bit which connects the foot plate to the crank bit at the back was of leather in the 70s but spares are still obtainable and should be kept supple with oil.
 
If the wheel has got a bit damp in the attic then you might also want to replace the yarn hooks on the flyer if they are rusty and pay attention to the inside of the orifice as if that's rusty then it will catch the fibres.
 
As well as treating the wood, you should oil your wheel (gun oil, again from Winghamwoolworks, or any light machine oil) a few times before you start, then every few days after that.  Once we see pics of the wheel we can suggest where you should oil, but basically anything that moves.
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: SallyintNorth on January 04, 2013, 04:58:18 am
Fantastic present  :thumbsup:

Here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s01JVb2eaz4#ws) is a video of Richard Ashford showing you where to oil your Ashford Traditional spinning wheel.  Does your wheel look similar to this one?
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: Bionic on January 04, 2013, 07:41:55 am
Hi norfolk newbies, my spinning wheel is an Ashford traditional like the one in the video below. It was secondhand when I got it and then it spent 10 years in my shed  :(
When I finally retrieved it my yarn hooks were very rusty, as Fleecewife has suggested below, and the whole thing was a bit damp and rickety. After a clean up, some oiling, a new drive band and new hooks and then making sure the whole thing is screwed together firmly its working well.
I hope you have hours of fun with yours.
Saly
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: norfolk newbies on January 04, 2013, 10:04:07 am
Thanks all
I have just found out that it is an Ashford wheel (DOH), I missed the Ashford imprint in our stygian gloom, found it when I moved it in the daylight. It looks like its a single drive thingy wheel.
It does look a bit like Sally's picture but with only one bump on the spindles.
OH said his dad put the wheel together and stained it, so it is a lot darker than Sally's vid.  I will see if I can get a picture up....
 
Next question, with longwool, would you card or comb? Bearing in mind that I have hand carders, but no 'combing' equipment.
 
The yarn hooks are not rusty but feel a bit sticky (in a metally way rather than honey sticky) so I presume it would be better to get replacements......
 
So much to learn!!! I guess I will be on this portion of the site a lot more
 
thanks again
Jo
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: jaykay on January 04, 2013, 11:07:46 am
An Ashford traditional is a good thing to have  ;D Lots of people have experience of them so will be able to help, and easy to get parts, plus they're good wheels and adaptable to do many types of spinning. My mum's is a dark-stained one too, I think it looks good  :)

You can probably wire wool the hooks to stop them being 'sticky'.

Longwool you comb, and you can do it with a dog comb, you don't need anything too sophisticated or expensive. This keeps those long fibres in parallel and when you spin it, you'll get strong yarn with good lustre.

Loads to learn and it's so much fun  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: Mammyshaz on January 04, 2013, 12:18:42 pm
An ashford traditional  :thumbsup: that's what I'm learning on. I love it  :love: not a clue what I'm actually doing   :roflanim: but joined a couple of clubs where experienced people are trying their hardest to keep  me on the right tracks   :innocent: ( thanks SITN  ;) )
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: SallyintNorth on January 04, 2013, 03:35:59 pm
joined a couple of clubs where experienced people are trying their hardest to keep  me on the right tracks   :innocent: ( thanks SITN  ;) )
Uh, that's "slightly more experienced people" - I'm only about 6 months ahead of you!  (And with nothing like the natural aptitude, so you'll streak past me in no time, I'm sure  :D)
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: SallyintNorth on January 04, 2013, 03:40:20 pm
It does look a bit like Sally's picture but with only one bump on the spindles.

If you are interested in dating it, Ashford have a 'timeline' you can download from their website here (http://www.ashford.co.nz/newsite/snippets/traditional-timeline)

If you check out online suppliers (Winghams Wools, P&M Woolcraft, Scottish Fibres to name but three) you will find the Ashford Traditional Maintenance Kit, which includes spinning wheel oil, flyer hooks, brake bands and springs, cotton drive band, conrod connector, etc - it's usually a good buy with an old neglected wheel, as you'll use several of the contents.
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: Fleecewife on January 04, 2013, 04:47:33 pm
....although I prefer the gun oil which is in a spray bottle to the drippy one Mr Ashford uses.    Couldn't help but notice he gave his oiling demo on a nice Persian rug - I would certainly get drips on that without the spray  :roflanim:   I wonder what Mrs Ashford thought   :D
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: norfolk newbies on January 07, 2013, 10:15:07 am
Thanks ( again) all
Sally - I am going to get the maintenance kit...sounds ideal.
I have to say there does seem to be a HUGE amount to learn......but I guess we all have to start somewhere  :) .
Jo
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: SallyintNorth on January 07, 2013, 12:02:11 pm
Aye, there's loads to learn - ain't it brilliant!  :excited:  :knit: :knit: :spin:

But the good news is, you can produce usable yarn before you know very much at all!   :thumbsup:  I know whereof I speak - this time last year I didn't have a wheel yet, I'd just tried - mainly unsuccessfully - to use Jaykay's Lendrum on one occasion for a few hours.)
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: Bionic on January 07, 2013, 12:13:01 pm

But the good news is, you can produce usable yarn before you know very much at all!   :thumbsup:   
I agree with Sally. I am fairly new to spinning also but have managed to make a hat from my (very variable) spinning and a jumper is in progress too.
the other Sally
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: renee on January 08, 2013, 06:17:39 pm

Next question, with longwool, would you card or comb? Bearing in mind that I have hand carders, but no 'combing' equipment.
 
Congrats on the wheel. Now, I don't know what condition your longwool is but if fairly clean and with locks that you can easily "tease" (seperate) by hand, you can flick card them on one carder. Just hold the carder in one hand, take a lock and, holding firmly, pull it through. Hold the part that has been nearest the sheep first,then reverse the process. I prefer spinning in the grease as I find it easier than with washed wool
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: SallyintNorth on January 08, 2013, 09:24:31 pm
Ooo, renee - I prefer spinning in the grease too, plus I really struggle to get washed fleece dried, but have been terrified of getting my carders all mucked up.  Do you wash your flick carder / carders?  And/or keep two sets, one for washed fibre and one for raw?
Title: Re: New to spinning - Wheel ID
Post by: renee on January 10, 2013, 11:42:04 am
I see your point. I do not use my carders. I have a carding bench and so far I have not washed it only card,comb greasy wool on it. In my past life when I used an industrial unit the wool had to be washed. Even then there was a lot of lanolin lest in it and twice a year I scraped the rollers..
By the way, why not cheat and blend your short wool with some longer fibres until you get the feel of spinning. You know that the best whisky is made from blended malt . :D
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-XEkf02Tk1ow/T9475dtOvhI/AAAAAAAALfU/pKIc0Zs6sOU/s576/IMG_7087.JPG?gl=SE)