Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink  (Read 3313 times)

Womble

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • Stirlingshire, Central Scotland
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2020, 11:35:10 am »


Indeed!!
"All fungi are edible. Some fungi are only edible once." -Terry Pratchett

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow. Some like to think it's in England.
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2020, 07:42:12 pm »
@Womble :  thanks for the "what can happen with a pressure cooker" pic - looks like a hob model and "Oh dear!"
Thankfully so many extra safety features built into newer ones, especially the electric cookers.

I was just about to fork-out for an Instant Pot myself (a stainless-steel liner pot is really the best way to go), but, as reported, the old combi' oven decided to give up the ghost.  A good new combi' microwave (not exactly cheap) had to be 1st priority.
I was sorely tempted to pay a bit more for a "flatbed" combi' oven model (no turntable), but someone reported their ceramic flatbed cracked after just 3 yrs (as I recall) and was thereby made irreparable/useless.  I'll leave that technology aside then until the next microwave oven replacement (if ever).

So my next concoction of chilli beans will be postponed:  I love my chilli beans (and can/could eat them over and over), but the last chilli bean cook-up, inc' red kidney beans, that I had was the one that immediately preceded my 1st IBS-like episode almost 2 yrs ago. I haven't been right since!
So, before I next eat any significant amount of pulses, I am going to get a pressure-cooker so that I know nasty bean lectins have been thoroughly cooked/destroyed above 100 degrees C. 

I read that red kidney beans are the worst, lectin-wise.  (I'm not sure about white kidney beans right now.)  I'll go take a look idc to make sure my next chilli bean concoction is as low in lectins as can be with the assistance of a pressure cooker, when the bank balance can, once again, accommodate an Instant Pot purchase.

« Last Edit: July 19, 2020, 09:18:54 pm by arobwk »

Steph Hen

  • Joined Jul 2013
  • Angus Scotland.
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2020, 12:47:41 pm »
Off topic but sprouting is meant to breakdown lectins too.

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow. Some like to think it's in England.
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2020, 05:31:29 pm »
Thanks for that thought @Steph Hen :  as regards the sprouts that might actually be "bean sprouts", are there any beans that are best avoided for sprouting, assuming they are then eaten raw in a salad?  (In particular, are red kidney beans a no-no for salad sprouting?)

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow. Some like to think it's in England.
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #19 on: July 31, 2020, 06:17:13 pm »
Oh dear, the new combi microwave power is a bit fierce:  I ended up frizzling (burning) some rice on microwave only - blimey!  (Might have pressed wrong buttons, but I don't think so.)
« Last Edit: July 31, 2020, 06:31:58 pm by arobwk »

doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
  • Qui? Moi?
    • ABERDON GUNDOGS for work and show
    • Facebook
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #20 on: August 01, 2020, 08:53:18 pm »
I have an old but trustworthy combi, but I haven't ever mastered the buttons so I just use it as an ordinary microwave.  Are your instructions easy to understand?  I haven't a clue where mine are
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

Buttermilk

  • Joined Jul 2014
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2020, 12:42:30 pm »
I love my combi microwave, especially the presets for things like baked potatoes which gets used a lot.

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow. Some like to think it's in England.
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #22 on: August 02, 2020, 03:48:46 pm »
I have an old but trustworthy combi, but I haven't ever mastered the buttons so I just use it as an ordinary microwave.  Are your instructions easy to understand?  I haven't a clue where mine are

I must get around to reading them soon!!  (I expect you could download a manual for your machine or a similar one if you were interested.  I seem to think most work roughly the same way.)
« Last Edit: August 02, 2020, 03:52:36 pm by arobwk »

doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
  • Qui? Moi?
    • ABERDON GUNDOGS for work and show
    • Facebook
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #23 on: August 02, 2020, 09:09:59 pm »
Doubt it, Curry's - no brand name, bought at least 12 years ago
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow. Some like to think it's in England.
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #24 on: October 04, 2020, 06:21:30 pm »
Was dithering over which Instant Pot pressure cooker model to buy, but have just gone for the newest offering (Duo Evo Plus) with modified/safer pressure-venting design. In the confines of my recently acquired small caravan's cooking area, I thought that would be best. 


Out of interest, anyone have one of these Instant Pot models already ?

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow. Some like to think it's in England.
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #25 on: March 19, 2021, 06:00:30 pm »
I have a question for anyone who is also routinely using a microwave multi-oven (micro/convection/grill oven):

In mine, pastry pies just do not cook well: the top always browns off early and the bottom pastry ends up soggy even when the innards are nice and hot. (They might behave the same way in a conventional oven, but I cannot test that anymore being without a standard cooker/oven.)
I'm now starting to think about ignoring 'standard' cooking instructions for a fan-oven in order to best bake pastry pies in the multi-:  e.g. cook upside down and turn over late in the bake;  or cover the pastry top with a pan and extend cooking time with a lower cooking temp' (hoping bottom pastry will "catch up");  turn over after top & innards cooked and then apply low-heat grill to the bottom pastry.  Etc !

Any experiences and/or tips for the scenario above, please, from any other multi-oven users ??!!
« Last Edit: March 19, 2021, 06:19:20 pm by arobwk »

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #26 on: March 19, 2021, 07:07:35 pm »
One way to make the pastry base not - or less - soggy is to bake the pastry "blind", ie., without filling, and then cook the complete pie.

If your combi oven doesn't have a "fan only" setting then I am not sure what you would use to hold the pastry down during cooking.... :thinking:

The other thing about pastry, conventionally cooked, is that tin is better for a crisp base than ceramic or glass.  But you can't use tin and microwave...

Sorry, more questions than answers...
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow. Some like to think it's in England.
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #27 on: March 19, 2021, 07:55:02 pm »
I should have said, SiN, that my pastry pies are invariably from a supermarket freezer  ;)  so blinding is not an option. 
(The latest large chicken and asparagus pie from Tesco was actually quite tasty despite soggy bottom, BUT altogether better when I re-cooked - rather than just re-warmed - the 2nd half up-side down this eve.) 
Thanks for the thought though.
These pies come in alu' trays and I would have thought this would transfer good amount of heat to the bottom pastry, but seemingly not!


arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow. Some like to think it's in England.
Re: Kitchen cooking equipment rethink
« Reply #28 on: March 20, 2021, 06:28:33 pm »
Egg flans though (shallow or deep) are always 'built' from the ground up because I find that off-the-shelf egg flans are just soft, mushy things (aerated to the nth degree).  I haven't tried cooking a home-made egg flan in a multi-cooker yet though:  I shall be extremely happy if I can somehow, idc, replicate one of my ex's miracles (a perfectly oven-cooked 3-4" deep veg flan - sometimes with a few bacon bits!) in a multi-oven.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2021, 10:56:20 pm by arobwk »

 

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