The Accidental Smallholder Forum

Livestock => Bees & Beekeeping => Topic started by: docsal on August 21, 2019, 01:01:24 pm

Title: Wasps
Post by: docsal on August 21, 2019, 01:01:24 pm
My poor bees are struggling in a permanent battle with invader wasps the last few weeks. The hive comes with a 'wasp guard' which is in place (essentially it limits the number of insects which can enter, so giving the guard bees a better chance of fighting them off one at a time). Does anyone more experienced have any tips??
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: DavidandCollette on August 21, 2019, 01:49:54 pm
The only other thing I know is to put some in a jar with water and put the lid back in with a small hole in it so the wasps can get in but not out
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: GribinIsaf on August 21, 2019, 04:36:08 pm
Last year we lost a colony to wasps.

This year we are using Wasp Bane - here: https://www.waspbane.com/ (https://www.waspbane.com/)

and the Wasp Out entrance guard - here: https://www.thorne.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&filter_name=wasp&product_id=7433 (https://www.thorne.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&filter_name=wasp&product_id=7433)

So far, so good.

If you are making your own trap it is interesting to read what Wasp Bane say about catching the scouts.
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: Dogwalker on August 22, 2019, 06:35:24 am
Get rid of the wasps nests early in the year before they become a problem.I've got loads of nests this year.  Over winter I intend to clear as many hibernation nests as I can find, slow them down next spring.
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: docsal on August 27, 2019, 12:56:58 pm
Thanks all. I set up 2 different DIY wasp traps on Sunday - by last night one had caught over 20 wasps and the other 5 or 6. No evidence of wasps this morning.......
Reassuringly there are no bees in either trap!

Next mission.... caterpillars in the brassicas  >:(
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: docsal on August 27, 2019, 12:58:59 pm
PS gribinlsaf - maybe I have caught the scouts???? Didn't expect such an instant impact
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: harmony on August 27, 2019, 01:09:03 pm

The bee inspector in my area showed me how she makes wasp guards based on the "tunnel" idea. It uses the type of hard plastic you get when you buy gift sets, that is used to make a see through lid. You score the plastic from end to end four times, so you can fold it to make a long, rectangle cover over the entrance. You fix with drawing pins. Bees work out to go in either end. Wasps see the entrance but aren't so bright as to go around the ends.



Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: DavidandCollette on August 28, 2019, 09:02:35 am
A photo would be useful please
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: landroverroy on August 28, 2019, 11:22:17 am
Get rid of the wasps nests early in the year before they become a problem.I've got loads of nests this year.  Over winter I intend to clear as many hibernation nests as I can find, slow them down next spring.


Where and how do you find "hibernation nests"?  :thinking:
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: Dogwalker on August 28, 2019, 12:27:09 pm
The queens hibernate in little golf ball size nests, often in roof spaces, lofts, sheds etc.
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: landroverroy on August 28, 2019, 03:11:42 pm
Aha - that explains a little golf ball sized structure that someone showed me the other day, that they had found in their loft and didn't know what it was. It was sort of papery and I said it looked like a wasp's nest but was far too small. So now I know! Every day a school day.  :sunshine:
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: DavidandCollette on August 29, 2019, 07:13:58 am
Light bulb day for me as well. Saw one earlier in the year
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: Dogwalker on August 29, 2019, 09:13:32 am
In the spring the queen starts a nest and the the first workers to hatch take over and she keeps laying as they build the layers up.I think sometimes she builds on the hibernation nest but usually starts nearby.  The workers die out in winter, so get rid of the winter nests, less queens to start the year.
Title: Re: Wasps
Post by: cloddopper on September 17, 2019, 10:38:12 pm
My poor bees are struggling in a permanent battle with invader wasps the last few weeks. The hive comes with a 'wasp guard' which is in place (essentially it limits the number of insects which can enter, so giving the guard bees a better chance of fighting them off one at a time). Does anyone more experienced have any tips??

 Most commercially made hives have " wooden hive blocks"   a slightly wedged length of wood that  neatly slips in the  usual  access gap  that can be used  in one or two positions . ( being slightly wedge shaped it is easier to push it in place just don't treat it with  insecticidal preservative ).

One gap face of the block is a single bee space ofthn an inch or so in from each of the outer ends of the block , on a face adjacent to these holes  in the middle of the block  is usually one only  triple width  bee space gap .

 Once the first frost arrives the bees slow down , the wasps will also slow , to stop the hive sweating , remove the block and slip a mouse guard on and hold it in place with long drawing pins .

 On thing  is ensure the bees have a full brood box & one super of honey to see them through any long wet winter , If they haven't got that much stores thy will need feeding PDQ   so they have time to evaporate the water off and cap the converted to honey syrup other wise it will go mouldy . Don't use  commercially made bakers fondant icing as feed patties .. often it has preservatives and anti mould chemicals in it which will kill your bees .
 Remember  it's no use feeding bees that have been starved as they will carry all manner of disease .
Normally I'd have fed & winterized all the fifty over wintering hives I had by the 14 September at the latest  and integrated the other 100 hives & neuc boxes  unless they were really strong ones  .