Author Topic: Nose Ringing Pigs  (Read 10329 times)

pigsatlesrues

  • Joined Oct 2008
  • Normandy, France
Nose Ringing Pigs
« on: October 25, 2007, 01:46:49 PM »
I was wondering if anyone had any view on this topic?

We are moving to a larger property early in the new year with our animals. We have about 15 breeding pigs and there offspring which will equate to somewhere in the reigion of 80 pigs on going as the babies grow through to processing.. The property we have now of two and a half acres doesn't have a blade of grass on it now, and has been devistated by the pigs rooting and digging around. The new property has 8 oak trees - all are about 200 years old, there is a brook running through the middle and the river sits at the end of the property,  and lush grass of which around 2 hectars will be for the pigs. It has been suggested to us in order to preserve the surroundings, that we nose ring the pigs to stop them being so distructive. I have never been in favour of anything like this. We would never crate the sows, and have never thought of affecting their normal behaviour before,wanting the pigs to live as naturally as possible enjoying their liberty. The distructiveness is a problem though, and I was hoping for some possitive responses on the subject.

Is it disstressing for them/painful or is it like having your ears pearced.
Would it really affect their quality of life that much - does it stop this normal behaviour totally? It is a dilema for us and we are looking forward to any information you have. Please be assured though, we love our pigs and their welfare is the most important thing to us and their quality of life, so we could live without grass again, but looking forward to everyones input!

Thank you

Kate

Bonjour et avoir un bon jour !

Hilarysmum

  • Joined Oct 2007
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2007, 10:34:49 AM »
I think pig nose ringing is a very personal and emotive thing so please understand this is my point of view not a direct attack on anyone who does ring their pigs.  Personally .... I think its barbaric and cant see the point of having outdoor pigs if stopping them from doing the most natural thing of all rooting.  Its like keeping a horse on a patch of mud to stop it grazing.  I do sympathise with the barren grass, our tammies are members of the scorched earth brigade, rampaging through the best grazing, reducing it to mud within a couple of weeks.  The only alternative is to strip graze them allowing each patch time to grow before putting them back on.  Thats very hard work though.

The trees, large oak trees will provide shade, acorns and possible shallow roots to graze.  Young oaks, our Hilary ate the bark off them all, most died.  She did it all within a day of being put in the paddock, not giving us time to realise our mistake.  Older oaks she scratches on until the bark is almost smooth, eats the acorns, dozes underneath.  They are all still standing.

Absolute and genuine apologies to anyone this posting might offend, it is my opinion only.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2009, 08:39:02 AM by Hilarysmum »

pigsatlesrues

  • Joined Oct 2008
  • Normandy, France
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2007, 06:01:05 PM »
Yes, the more I have thought about it the more I think the same as you Hilarysmum.

I isn't anything we had considered until a friend suggested it on the basis of preserving colour on the property. I think I am thinking that baron land comes with the territory when it comes to our piglies. Pigs rule and all that!!

I think though we will put a protection zone around the oak trees. It will still give the beasts plenty of space to root around but it would be devistating to see such beautiful trees stripped after all the years they have graced the landscape.

Thanks again, question asked and answered.

Kate
Bonjour et avoir un bon jour !

Hilarysmum

  • Joined Oct 2007
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2007, 08:10:25 AM »
Hi Kate, hope it did not come across as too forceful.  I had a sow who was nose ringed when we got her.  Poor animal was in a terrible state.  Had to get the vet out to remove the ring.  Horrendous experience. 

pigman

  • Joined Dec 2007
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2007, 01:24:11 PM »
Yes, the more I have thought about it the more I think the same as you Hilarysmum.

I isn't anything we had considered until a friend suggested it on the basis of preserving colour on the property. I think I am thinking that baron land comes with the territory when it comes to our piglies. Pigs rule and all that!!

I think though we will put a protection zone around the oak trees. It will still give the beasts plenty of space to root around but it would be devistating to see such beautiful trees stripped after all the years they have graced the landscape.

Thanks again, question asked and answered.

Kate

I agree on the nose ringing.  We bought a pig in once with a nose ring and it didn't really stop her from rooting.  If you ever feel like re-seeding, re-seed with clover grass.  It tends to survive pigs alot better than other grasses and of course it neutralizes the pig poo.

Hilarysmum

  • Joined Oct 2007
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2007, 05:56:25 PM »
 ;D ;D ;D

nose ringing and sow crates are my pet hates. 

jackle23

  • Joined Jan 2009
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2009, 06:55:32 PM »
you should only use nose rings if you keep your pigs on grass but if there are roots and stuff you cant put one on might injure them if they try to root.the ring will let them graze but not root

pegusus pig

  • Joined Feb 2009
  • Anglesey, North wales
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2009, 08:07:11 PM »
When I was a kid the pigs we had had rings put in. It was awful and I don’t remember that it did any good at all apart from making the pigs miserable, one even managed to pull the ring out and bleed every where (the vet had to be called, very distressing and big bills), I'd never use them on my pigs, instead I have penned the field so they get moved around, doesn’t give great amounts of green but means different areas get rested, (I'll have a think about the clover grass as that may help.)
As for the create I hated the idea of using it until Joanna (a large white) had per babies out she killed 10 only 4 lived, it was horrendous not being able to get to the babies or her to help, she was so aggressive, in the end we got the neighbours down who tipped the arch over, somehow they got her in a shed, in a create (I'd run to the house crying couldn't stand the yelling, pig shouting and the babies dieing. I was only 12 at the time!!)
I have mangalitzas now and have been very worried about the farrowing needless to say both the sows have had they litters in a large shed without the use of a create, I’m very proud of my girls and next time i think they will be fine having them out.
I love seeing my girls out and doing as nature intended rooting around!!!

sabrina

  • Joined Nov 2008
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2009, 08:44:53 PM »
Near Elgin there are lots of outdoor pigs, sows with litters are kept in areas with electric fencing and have a pig ark for shelter. There are larger areas with groups of pigs  again with the electric fencing. You can see that they have dug up the ground but are moved about when needed and they must reseed areas  once pigs have been moved.

Malc

  • Joined Oct 2007
    • The Edge of Nowhere
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2009, 01:47:02 PM »
I'm glad you're having second thoughts about nose rings. It's tough to see your ground being trashed, but I reckon that goes with the territory. I'm not comfortable with ringing, tail-docking, castration or even ear-notching and I get downright angry when the subject of crates comes up.

Hope you find a solution.

Higgins11

  • Joined Nov 2008
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2009, 03:33:01 PM »
You don't Castrate?

how does that meat taste :P ???

Hilarysmum

  • Joined Oct 2007
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2009, 03:39:28 PM »
Jumping in here, we have only ever castrated once, the meat has always been fine.  I like to tell the story of my friend who sent her 18 month old tamworth to our abattoir.  He came back in 4 pieces as no one could carry a half.  Despite having worked for 9 months, he was absolutely delicious. No taint, no funny taste.

I am told that in UK intensively reared males for supermarkets are not castrated.  Does anyone know if thats true?

 :-[ Apologies for jumping into the conversation.

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: Nose Ringing Pigs
« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2009, 04:28:52 PM »
I understand that they are not - they are slaughtered before they are sexually mature.

We don't castrate ours either and have never had a problem with taint.

 

People's thoughts on ringing pigs noses?

Started by Azzdodd

Replies: 11
Views: 446
Last post March 13, 2014, 12:44:23 PM
by Azzdodd
Ringing Kunes

Started by ChaseView

Replies: 11
Views: 680
Last post October 10, 2012, 10:55:33 PM
by hughesy
Nose rings

Started by pikilily

Replies: 56
Views: 4372
Last post December 08, 2010, 10:30:04 AM
by Hilarysmum
Weaners Nose problems?

Started by Porkeypiglet

Replies: 9
Views: 4435
Last post February 17, 2008, 08:15:26 AM
by Hilarysmum
Got my first pigs

Started by The Chicken Lady

Replies: 14
Views: 4589
Last post April 01, 2008, 10:31:41 AM
by Hilarysmum

Forum sponsors

Thomson & Morgan G.J.W. Titmuss Scottish Smallholder & Grower Spring Gathering Smallholder Shop Innovative Timber Structures Load Handler

© The Accidental Smallholder Ltd 2003-2014. All rights reserved.

Design by Furness Internet

Site developed by Champion IS